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Article: Variations in blood flow on mandibular glandular secretion to autonomic nervous stimulations in anesthetized dogs

TitleVariations in blood flow on mandibular glandular secretion to autonomic nervous stimulations in anesthetized dogs
Authors
Issue Date1990
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0022-3751
Citation
Journal Of Physiology, 1990, v. 431, p. 479-493 How to Cite?
Abstract1. Continuous stimulation of the preganglionic parasympathetic nerve (the ramus communicans of the mandibular ganglion) for 1-2 min at supramaximal voltage (5 V) and pulse duration (1 ms) increased salivary gland arterial inflow and this was accompanied by copious salivary secretion. The responses were recorded continuously during the period of stimulation. The frequency for initiating the responses was 0.5 Hz. Maximal responses occurred at 16 Hz. The response coefficient of arterial inflow to stimulus frequency was 0.17 ml min-1 g-1 Hz-1 and that of secretion to stimulus frequency was 0.016 ml min-1 g-1 Hz-1. 2. The secretory response to low and moderate levels of parasympathetic nerve stimulation (below 8 Hz) was not affected by a reduction or cessation in aterial inflow whereas the response to high level parasympathetic nerve stimulation (above 8 Hz) was significantly alleviated if blood flow to the gland was maintained (via controlled vascular perfusion) at a level less than that of the resting arterial inflow. However, when the gland was already secreting near-maximally (stimulated at 8 Hz), sudden cessation of blood flow for a short period of time (0.5-2 min) had no effect on the salivary flow. 3. Continuous stimulation of the cervical sympathetic nerve for 1-2 min at supramaximal voltage (20 V) and pulse duration (1 ms) decreased arterial inflow and this was accompanied by scanty salivary secretion. The vascular response persisted during the period of stimulation. The secretory response was 15 s late in onset and might continue for 1 min after stimulation. The frequency for inititating the responses was 1-4 Hz. Maximal responses occurred at 16-32 Hz. The response coefficient of arterial inflow to stimulus frequency was -0.04 ml min-1 g-1 Hz-1 and that of salivary secretion to stimulus frequency was 0.001 ml min-1 g-1 Hz-1. 4. The secretory response to sympathetic nerve stimulation at different frequencies in glands with blood flow maintained at resting rate (via controlled vascular perfusion) resembled that in glands with spontaneous blood flow. 5. Sympathetic nerve stimulation was found to retard salivary secretion caused by parasympathetic stimulation, irrespective of whether the gland received spontaneous arterial inflow or controlled vascular perfusion at a resting flow rate. 6. The results suggest that the salivary secretion to stimulation of parasympathetic nerve is independent of blood flow over a wide range of stimulus frequencies; however, the response to high frequency stimulation of the parasympathetic nerve may be affected by fluctuations in blood flow. Retardation of parasympathetic-induced salivary flow by superimposed sympathetic nerve stimulation may not be related to blood flow changes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171545
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.731
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.670
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLung, MAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:15:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:15:37Z-
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Physiology, 1990, v. 431, p. 479-493en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-3751en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171545-
dc.description.abstract1. Continuous stimulation of the preganglionic parasympathetic nerve (the ramus communicans of the mandibular ganglion) for 1-2 min at supramaximal voltage (5 V) and pulse duration (1 ms) increased salivary gland arterial inflow and this was accompanied by copious salivary secretion. The responses were recorded continuously during the period of stimulation. The frequency for initiating the responses was 0.5 Hz. Maximal responses occurred at 16 Hz. The response coefficient of arterial inflow to stimulus frequency was 0.17 ml min-1 g-1 Hz-1 and that of secretion to stimulus frequency was 0.016 ml min-1 g-1 Hz-1. 2. The secretory response to low and moderate levels of parasympathetic nerve stimulation (below 8 Hz) was not affected by a reduction or cessation in aterial inflow whereas the response to high level parasympathetic nerve stimulation (above 8 Hz) was significantly alleviated if blood flow to the gland was maintained (via controlled vascular perfusion) at a level less than that of the resting arterial inflow. However, when the gland was already secreting near-maximally (stimulated at 8 Hz), sudden cessation of blood flow for a short period of time (0.5-2 min) had no effect on the salivary flow. 3. Continuous stimulation of the cervical sympathetic nerve for 1-2 min at supramaximal voltage (20 V) and pulse duration (1 ms) decreased arterial inflow and this was accompanied by scanty salivary secretion. The vascular response persisted during the period of stimulation. The secretory response was 15 s late in onset and might continue for 1 min after stimulation. The frequency for inititating the responses was 1-4 Hz. Maximal responses occurred at 16-32 Hz. The response coefficient of arterial inflow to stimulus frequency was -0.04 ml min-1 g-1 Hz-1 and that of salivary secretion to stimulus frequency was 0.001 ml min-1 g-1 Hz-1. 4. The secretory response to sympathetic nerve stimulation at different frequencies in glands with blood flow maintained at resting rate (via controlled vascular perfusion) resembled that in glands with spontaneous blood flow. 5. Sympathetic nerve stimulation was found to retard salivary secretion caused by parasympathetic stimulation, irrespective of whether the gland received spontaneous arterial inflow or controlled vascular perfusion at a resting flow rate. 6. The results suggest that the salivary secretion to stimulation of parasympathetic nerve is independent of blood flow over a wide range of stimulus frequencies; however, the response to high frequency stimulation of the parasympathetic nerve may be affected by fluctuations in blood flow. Retardation of parasympathetic-induced salivary flow by superimposed sympathetic nerve stimulation may not be related to blood flow changes.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0022-3751en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnesthesia, Intravenousen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshArteries - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAutonomic Nervous System - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDogsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshParasympathetic Nervous System - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRegional Blood Flow - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSaliva - Secretionen_US
dc.subject.meshSubmandibular Gland - Blood Supply - Physiology - Secretionen_US
dc.subject.meshSympathetic Nervous System - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleVariations in blood flow on mandibular glandular secretion to autonomic nervous stimulations in anesthetized dogsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLung, MA:makylung@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLung, MA=rp00319en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid2100314-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0025676532en_US
dc.identifier.volume431en_US
dc.identifier.spage479en_US
dc.identifier.epage493en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1990EM92300025-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLung, MA=7006411781en_US

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