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Article: Effects of alcohols on gastric and small intestinal apical membrane integrity and fluidity

TitleEffects of alcohols on gastric and small intestinal apical membrane integrity and fluidity
Authors
Issue Date1988
PublisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://gut.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Gut, 1988, v. 29 n. 12, p. 1648-1655 How to Cite?
AbstractDuodenal and jejunal brush border membrane vesicle integrity was studied after in vitro treatment of rabbit tissue with ethyl, benzyl or octyl alcohol. The effects of the alcohols on gastric parietal cell apical and microsomal membrane vesicle integrity was also studied. Membrane vesicle integrity was determined from the enclosed volume of the vesicle preparations, measured as [14C]glucose space at equilibrium. Exposure of vesicles to the three alcohols caused concentration dependent decreases in enclosed volume. The rank order of potency of the alcohols was octyl > benzyl > ethyl. Concentrations ≥10 mM benzyl alcohol significantly reduced the enclosed volume of duodenal or jejunal vesicles; jejunal vesicles were disrupted by 625 mM ethanol, whereas 2 M ethanol was required to disrupt the duodenal vesicles. Gastric apical membrane integrity was reduced with 0.25 M ethanol, the vesicles being approximately an order of magnitude more sensitive to ethanol than gross estimates of gastric mucosal damage, but 1 M ethanol was required to significantly damage gastric microsomes. All concentrations of benzyl or octyl alcohol tested (≥5 mM) reduced the enclosed volume of both gastric apical membrane vesicles and gastric microsomes. As determined by shrink-swell techniques, benzyl alcohol permeated duodenal vesicles at a faster rate than NH4Cl (apparent rate constant of 9.89 (0.71) x 10-3 s-1 compared with 4.48 (0.23) x 10-3 s-1). Therefore, reductions in enclosed volume in response to alcohol treatment could not be explained by alcohol induced osmotic shrinkage. The enclosed volume of the vesicles after alcohol treatment was negatively correlated with membrane fluidity suggesting a common causal effect, the increased fluidity increasing membrane fragility. Duodenal vesicles were more resistant to disruption by the alcohols compared with gastric and jejunal vesicles.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171527
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 14.921
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.474
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBallard, HJen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilkes, JMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHirst, BHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:15:32Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:15:32Z-
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.identifier.citationGut, 1988, v. 29 n. 12, p. 1648-1655en_US
dc.identifier.issn0017-5749en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171527-
dc.description.abstractDuodenal and jejunal brush border membrane vesicle integrity was studied after in vitro treatment of rabbit tissue with ethyl, benzyl or octyl alcohol. The effects of the alcohols on gastric parietal cell apical and microsomal membrane vesicle integrity was also studied. Membrane vesicle integrity was determined from the enclosed volume of the vesicle preparations, measured as [14C]glucose space at equilibrium. Exposure of vesicles to the three alcohols caused concentration dependent decreases in enclosed volume. The rank order of potency of the alcohols was octyl > benzyl > ethyl. Concentrations ≥10 mM benzyl alcohol significantly reduced the enclosed volume of duodenal or jejunal vesicles; jejunal vesicles were disrupted by 625 mM ethanol, whereas 2 M ethanol was required to disrupt the duodenal vesicles. Gastric apical membrane integrity was reduced with 0.25 M ethanol, the vesicles being approximately an order of magnitude more sensitive to ethanol than gross estimates of gastric mucosal damage, but 1 M ethanol was required to significantly damage gastric microsomes. All concentrations of benzyl or octyl alcohol tested (≥5 mM) reduced the enclosed volume of both gastric apical membrane vesicles and gastric microsomes. As determined by shrink-swell techniques, benzyl alcohol permeated duodenal vesicles at a faster rate than NH4Cl (apparent rate constant of 9.89 (0.71) x 10-3 s-1 compared with 4.48 (0.23) x 10-3 s-1). Therefore, reductions in enclosed volume in response to alcohol treatment could not be explained by alcohol induced osmotic shrinkage. The enclosed volume of the vesicles after alcohol treatment was negatively correlated with membrane fluidity suggesting a common causal effect, the increased fluidity increasing membrane fragility. Duodenal vesicles were more resistant to disruption by the alcohols compared with gastric and jejunal vesicles.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://gut.bmjjournals.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofGuten_US
dc.subject.meshAlcohols - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBenzyl Alcohols - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDuodenum - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.subject.meshEthanol - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshGastric Mucosa - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshJejunum - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.subject.meshMembrane Fluidity - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshMicrosomes - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshMicrovilli - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshOctanols - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshParietal Cells, Gastric - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshRabbitsen_US
dc.titleEffects of alcohols on gastric and small intestinal apical membrane integrity and fluidityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailBallard, HJ:ballard@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityBallard, HJ=rp00367en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/gut.29.12.1648-
dc.identifier.pmid3220304-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0024223470en_US
dc.identifier.volume29en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.spage1648en_US
dc.identifier.epage1655en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1988R617000006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBallard, HJ=7005286310en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilkes, JM=7102513233en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHirst, BH=7005256376en_US

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