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Article: Comparison of anti-diabetic drug prescribing in children and adolescents in seven European countries.

TitleComparison of anti-diabetic drug prescribing in children and adolescents in seven European countries.
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BJCP
Citation
British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 2011, v. 72 n. 6, p. 969-977 How to Cite?
AbstractAIMS: The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of diabetes in children across seven European countries, when using prescribing of anti-diabetics as a proxy for diabetes. A secondary aim was to assess the potential for collaboration between countries using different databases in diabetes research. METHODS: Data were obtained from population-based clinical databases in seven European countries. The study population comprised children aged 0-18 years. Prescriptions were categorized using the Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification. The one-year user prevalence in 2008 was calculated for each country and stratified by age and sex. RESULTS: We studied a total of 5.8 million children and adolescents. The prevalence of insulin prescribing varied between 1.1 and 3.5 per 1000 population, being highest in Sweden and lowest in Italy. In all countries, novel insulin analogues were the most commonly used insulins. The prevalence of oral anti-diabetic prescribing ranged from 0.08 per 1000 individuals in Sweden and Germany to 0.21 per 1000 population in the UK. Overall, the absolute number of oral anti-diabetic users was very low. CONCLUSION: This study shows that there is a varying frequency of type 1 diabetes in children and adolescents across Europe. We also demonstrated that it is possible to obtain similar information from different clinical databases within Europe, which would allow continuous monitoring of type 1 diabetes. Owing to the lack of indications in most of the databases, this approach is less suitable for type 2 diabetes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171433
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.83
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.486
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNeubert, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorHsia, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorde Jong-van den Berg, LTWen_US
dc.contributor.authorJanhsen, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorGlaeske, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorFuru, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorKieler, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorNorgaard, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorClavenna, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:14:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:14:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 2011, v. 72 n. 6, p. 969-977en_US
dc.identifier.issn0306-5251en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171433-
dc.description.abstractAIMS: The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of diabetes in children across seven European countries, when using prescribing of anti-diabetics as a proxy for diabetes. A secondary aim was to assess the potential for collaboration between countries using different databases in diabetes research. METHODS: Data were obtained from population-based clinical databases in seven European countries. The study population comprised children aged 0-18 years. Prescriptions were categorized using the Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification. The one-year user prevalence in 2008 was calculated for each country and stratified by age and sex. RESULTS: We studied a total of 5.8 million children and adolescents. The prevalence of insulin prescribing varied between 1.1 and 3.5 per 1000 population, being highest in Sweden and lowest in Italy. In all countries, novel insulin analogues were the most commonly used insulins. The prevalence of oral anti-diabetic prescribing ranged from 0.08 per 1000 individuals in Sweden and Germany to 0.21 per 1000 population in the UK. Overall, the absolute number of oral anti-diabetic users was very low. CONCLUSION: This study shows that there is a varying frequency of type 1 diabetes in children and adolescents across Europe. We also demonstrated that it is possible to obtain similar information from different clinical databases within Europe, which would allow continuous monitoring of type 1 diabetes. Owing to the lack of indications in most of the databases, this approach is less suitable for type 2 diabetes.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BJCPen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Clinical Pharmacologyen_US
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysician's Practice Patterns - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshInsulin - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshHypoglycemic Agents - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshEurope - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - Drug Therapy - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - drug therapy - epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy - epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHypoglycemic Agents - therapeutic useen_US
dc.subject.meshInsulin - therapeutic useen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysician's Practice Patterns - statistics and numerical dataen_US
dc.titleComparison of anti-diabetic drug prescribing in children and adolescents in seven European countries.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK: wongick@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2125.2011.04045.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid21689139-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3244645-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80855138615en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80855138615&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume72en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage969en_US
dc.identifier.epage977en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000296901900014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridClavenna, A=6602672880en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNørgaard, M=7003353479en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKieler, H=6701734062en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridde Jongvan den Berg, LTW=7102440197en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHsia, Y=35068032100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNeubert, A=7003774960en_US

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