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Article: Survey of administration of medicines to pupils in primary schools within the London area

TitleSurvey of administration of medicines to pupils in primary schools within the London area
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archdischild.com/
Citation
Archives Of Disease In Childhood, 2004, v. 89 n. 11, p. 998-1001 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To examine the policy, administration, and supervision of medicine administration in primary schools within the Greater London area (GLA). Design: A prospective survey using postal questionnaires sent to 172 randomly selected primary schools within the GLA. Participants: Head teachers of primary schools. Results: Some 65% of head teachers replied. Less than 50% of responding head teachers had actually read the national guidelines Supporting Pupils with Medical Needs and only 30% of respondents were aware of other members of staff who had read the document. A total of 95% of respondents followed a policy/procedure in caring for the medical needs of pupils. Over 80% of respondents had staff handling the pupils' medical needs, staff handling access to stored medicines, and prior arrangements for staff training. However, it is worrying that a quarter of the schools did not keep a written record of medicines given to children in schools. The majority of staff with responsibility for medicine administration in schools are support staff. The most encouraging findings were that for the majority of schools with children using the EpiPen and rectal diazepam, there were trained staff to administer these medicines. Conclusions: The majority of schools had a policy in place to deal with medicine administration, although further work should be conducted to analyse the content of such policies. It is very important that training is directed at staff responsible for medicine administration and not just at teachers. Most schools were willing to administer rectal diazepam and EpiPen treatment in an emergency.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171417
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.231
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.118
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICKen_US
dc.contributor.authorAwolowo, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorMo, YWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:14:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:14:03Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Disease In Childhood, 2004, v. 89 n. 11, p. 998-1001en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-9888en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171417-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine the policy, administration, and supervision of medicine administration in primary schools within the Greater London area (GLA). Design: A prospective survey using postal questionnaires sent to 172 randomly selected primary schools within the GLA. Participants: Head teachers of primary schools. Results: Some 65% of head teachers replied. Less than 50% of responding head teachers had actually read the national guidelines Supporting Pupils with Medical Needs and only 30% of respondents were aware of other members of staff who had read the document. A total of 95% of respondents followed a policy/procedure in caring for the medical needs of pupils. Over 80% of respondents had staff handling the pupils' medical needs, staff handling access to stored medicines, and prior arrangements for staff training. However, it is worrying that a quarter of the schools did not keep a written record of medicines given to children in schools. The majority of staff with responsibility for medicine administration in schools are support staff. The most encouraging findings were that for the majority of schools with children using the EpiPen and rectal diazepam, there were trained staff to administer these medicines. Conclusions: The majority of schools had a policy in place to deal with medicine administration, although further work should be conducted to analyse the content of such policies. It is very important that training is directed at staff responsible for medicine administration and not just at teachers. Most schools were willing to administer rectal diazepam and EpiPen treatment in an emergency.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archdischild.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Disease in Childhooden_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshEducation, Continuing - Standardsen_US
dc.subject.meshEmergenciesen_US
dc.subject.meshForms And Records Control - Standardsen_US
dc.subject.meshGuideline Adherence - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Care Surveysen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Policyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLondonen_US
dc.subject.meshPharmaceutical Preparations - Administration & Dosageen_US
dc.subject.meshPractice Guidelines As Topicen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshSchool Health Services - Organization & Administration - Standardsen_US
dc.titleSurvey of administration of medicines to pupils in primary schools within the London areaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK:wongick@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/adc.2003.047258en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15499050-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-7944227366en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-7944227366&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume89en_US
dc.identifier.issue11en_US
dc.identifier.spage998en_US
dc.identifier.epage1001en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000224696700004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAwolowo, T=6507805083en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGordon, K=8930933900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMo, YW=7202961575en_US

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