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Article: Changing trends in antiepileptic drug prescribing in girls of child-bearing potential

TitleChanging trends in antiepileptic drug prescribing in girls of child-bearing potential
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archdischild.com/
Citation
Archives Of Disease In Childhood, 2009, v. 94 n. 6, p. 443-447 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To characterize trends in prescribing carbamazepine (CBZ), sodium valproate (VPA) and lamotrigine (LTG) in adolescent females in the UK and to examine possible reasons for changing trends. Design: Population-based observational study. Setting: UK General Practice Research Database between 1 January 1993 and 31 December 2006. Patients: 12-18-year-old subjects who were issued ≥1 CBZ, VPA or LTG prescription. Main outcome measures: Prescribing prevalences stratified by age, gender and antiepileptic drug. Results: 5417 patients (47.6% females) were prescribed 147 111 prescriptions for CBZ (34.5%), VPA (38.6%) or LTG (26.9%). The prevalence of LTG prescribing in females increased from 0.08 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.12) to 0.80 (95% CI 0.70 to 0.89) per 1000 female population. Conversely, the prevalence in females of CBZ and VPA prescribing significantly decreased from 1.00 (95% CI 0.85 to 1.15) to 0.51 (95% CI 0.44 to 0.58) and from 0.94 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.09) to 0.63 (95% CI 0.55 to 0.72), respectively. This 10-fold rise in LTG prescribing in females is much higher than the fivefold rise in males from 0.09 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.14) to 0.47 (95% CI 0.40 to 0.54) per 1000 male population. Conclusion: The practice of prescribing antiepileptic drugs in adolescents has changed gradually over the last decade. More females aged 12-18 years are prescribed LTG than CBZ or VPA and the increase is much greater than for males. The increase in LTG prescribing mirrors a corresponding decrease in both VPA and CBZ. Concerns about potential problems to offspring appear to be affecting prescription trends in adolescent females of child-bearing potential.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171382
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.231
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.118
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAckers, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorBesag, FMCen_US
dc.contributor.authorWade, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, MLen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:13:46Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:13:46Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Disease In Childhood, 2009, v. 94 n. 6, p. 443-447en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-9888en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171382-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To characterize trends in prescribing carbamazepine (CBZ), sodium valproate (VPA) and lamotrigine (LTG) in adolescent females in the UK and to examine possible reasons for changing trends. Design: Population-based observational study. Setting: UK General Practice Research Database between 1 January 1993 and 31 December 2006. Patients: 12-18-year-old subjects who were issued ≥1 CBZ, VPA or LTG prescription. Main outcome measures: Prescribing prevalences stratified by age, gender and antiepileptic drug. Results: 5417 patients (47.6% females) were prescribed 147 111 prescriptions for CBZ (34.5%), VPA (38.6%) or LTG (26.9%). The prevalence of LTG prescribing in females increased from 0.08 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.12) to 0.80 (95% CI 0.70 to 0.89) per 1000 female population. Conversely, the prevalence in females of CBZ and VPA prescribing significantly decreased from 1.00 (95% CI 0.85 to 1.15) to 0.51 (95% CI 0.44 to 0.58) and from 0.94 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.09) to 0.63 (95% CI 0.55 to 0.72), respectively. This 10-fold rise in LTG prescribing in females is much higher than the fivefold rise in males from 0.09 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.14) to 0.47 (95% CI 0.40 to 0.54) per 1000 male population. Conclusion: The practice of prescribing antiepileptic drugs in adolescents has changed gradually over the last decade. More females aged 12-18 years are prescribed LTG than CBZ or VPA and the increase is much greater than for males. The increase in LTG prescribing mirrors a corresponding decrease in both VPA and CBZ. Concerns about potential problems to offspring appear to be affecting prescription trends in adolescent females of child-bearing potential.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archdischild.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Disease in Childhooden_US
dc.subject.meshAbnormalities, Drug-Induced - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAnticonvulsants - Adverse Effects - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshCarbamazepine - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshContraceptive Agents - Administration & Dosageen_US
dc.subject.meshDrug Interactionsen_US
dc.subject.meshEpilepsy - Drug Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysician's Practice Patterns - Trendsen_US
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_US
dc.subject.meshTriazines - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshValproic Acid - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.titleChanging trends in antiepileptic drug prescribing in girls of child-bearing potentialen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK:wongick@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/adc.2008.144386en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19307197-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-66749180744en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-66749180744&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume94en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage443en_US
dc.identifier.epage447en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000266272100011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAckers, R=16308666600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBesag, FMC=7004367676en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWade, A=7202754332en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, ML=7403583537en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_US

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