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Article: Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: Treatment discontinuation in adolescents and young adults

TitleAttention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: Treatment discontinuation in adolescents and young adults
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherRoyal College of Psychiatrists. The Journal's web site is located at http://bjp.rcpsych.org/
Citation
British Journal Of Psychiatry, 2009, v. 194 n. 3, p. 273-277 How to Cite?
Abstract
Background Symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are known to persist into adulthood in the majority of cases. Aims To determine the prevalence of methylphenidate, dexamfetamine and atomoxetine prescribing and treatment discontinuation in adolescents and young adults. Method A descriptive cohort study using the UK General Practice Research Database included patients aged 15-21 years from 1999 to 2006 with a prescription for a study drug. Results Prevalence of prescribing averaged across all ages increased 6.23-fold over the study period. Overall, prevalence decreased with age: in 2006, prevalence in males dropped 95% from 12.77 per 1000 in 15-year-olds to 0.64 per 1000 in 21-year-olds. A longitudinal analysis of a cohort of 44 patients aged 15 years in 1999 demonstrated that no patient received treatment after the age of 21 years. Conclusions The prevalence of prescribing by general practitioners to patients with ADHD drops significantly from age 15 to age 21 years. The fall in prescribing is greater than the reported age-related decrease in symptoms, raising the possibility that treatment is prematurely discontinued in some young adults in whom symptoms persist.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171377
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 7.343
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. University of Dundee College of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing
  2. King's College London
  3. Medical Research Council
  4. Royal Liverpool Children's NHS Trust
  5. School of Community Health Sciences
  6. UCL Institute of Child Health
  7. Medicines and Health Care products Regulatory Agency
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMccarthy, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorAsherson, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorCoghill, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorHollis, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorPotts, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorSayal, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Soysa, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:13:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:13:43Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Psychiatry, 2009, v. 194 n. 3, p. 273-277en_US
dc.identifier.issn0007-1250en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171377-
dc.description.abstractBackground Symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are known to persist into adulthood in the majority of cases. Aims To determine the prevalence of methylphenidate, dexamfetamine and atomoxetine prescribing and treatment discontinuation in adolescents and young adults. Method A descriptive cohort study using the UK General Practice Research Database included patients aged 15-21 years from 1999 to 2006 with a prescription for a study drug. Results Prevalence of prescribing averaged across all ages increased 6.23-fold over the study period. Overall, prevalence decreased with age: in 2006, prevalence in males dropped 95% from 12.77 per 1000 in 15-year-olds to 0.64 per 1000 in 21-year-olds. A longitudinal analysis of a cohort of 44 patients aged 15 years in 1999 demonstrated that no patient received treatment after the age of 21 years. Conclusions The prevalence of prescribing by general practitioners to patients with ADHD drops significantly from age 15 to age 21 years. The fall in prescribing is greater than the reported age-related decrease in symptoms, raising the possibility that treatment is prematurely discontinued in some young adults in whom symptoms persist.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoyal College of Psychiatrists. The Journal's web site is located at http://bjp.rcpsych.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Psychiatryen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAttention Deficit Disorder With Hyperactivity - Drug Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDextroamphetamine - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshDopamine Uptake Inhibitors - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGreat Britainen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMethylphenidate - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysician's Practice Patterns - Trendsen_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshPropylamines - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshWithholding Treatment - Trendsen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleAttention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: Treatment discontinuation in adolescents and young adultsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK:wongick@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1192/bjp.bp.107.045245en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19252159en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-62149108195en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-62149108195&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume194en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage273en_US
dc.identifier.epage277en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1472-1465-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000264387100013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcCarthy, S=26323217800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAsherson, P=35402700900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCoghill, D=6603562184en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHollis, C=7006624553en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, M=7403583537en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPotts, L=26323388900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSayal, K=6701748666en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Soysa, R=26323165600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTaylor, E=7403206584en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliams, T=7404171819en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, ICK=7102513915en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike10243264-

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