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Article: Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: Treatment discontinuation in adolescents and young adults
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TitleAttention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: Treatment discontinuation in adolescents and young adults
 
AuthorsMccarthy, S6
Asherson, P3
Coghill, D1
Hollis, C5
Murray, M6
Potts, L2
Sayal, K5
De Soysa, R4
Taylor, E2
Williams, T7
Wong, ICK6
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherRoyal College of Psychiatrists. The Journal's web site is located at http://bjp.rcpsych.org/
 
CitationBritish Journal Of Psychiatry, 2009, v. 194 n. 3, p. 273-277 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.107.045245
 
AbstractBackground Symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are known to persist into adulthood in the majority of cases. Aims To determine the prevalence of methylphenidate, dexamfetamine and atomoxetine prescribing and treatment discontinuation in adolescents and young adults. Method A descriptive cohort study using the UK General Practice Research Database included patients aged 15-21 years from 1999 to 2006 with a prescription for a study drug. Results Prevalence of prescribing averaged across all ages increased 6.23-fold over the study period. Overall, prevalence decreased with age: in 2006, prevalence in males dropped 95% from 12.77 per 1000 in 15-year-olds to 0.64 per 1000 in 21-year-olds. A longitudinal analysis of a cohort of 44 patients aged 15 years in 1999 demonstrated that no patient received treatment after the age of 21 years. Conclusions The prevalence of prescribing by general practitioners to patients with ADHD drops significantly from age 15 to age 21 years. The fall in prescribing is greater than the reported age-related decrease in symptoms, raising the possibility that treatment is prematurely discontinued in some young adults in whom symptoms persist.
 
ISSN0007-1250
2013 Impact Factor: 7.343
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.107.045245
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000264387100013
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorMccarthy, S
 
dc.contributor.authorAsherson, P
 
dc.contributor.authorCoghill, D
 
dc.contributor.authorHollis, C
 
dc.contributor.authorMurray, M
 
dc.contributor.authorPotts, L
 
dc.contributor.authorSayal, K
 
dc.contributor.authorDe Soysa, R
 
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, E
 
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, T
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICK
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:13:43Z
 
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:13:43Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractBackground Symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are known to persist into adulthood in the majority of cases. Aims To determine the prevalence of methylphenidate, dexamfetamine and atomoxetine prescribing and treatment discontinuation in adolescents and young adults. Method A descriptive cohort study using the UK General Practice Research Database included patients aged 15-21 years from 1999 to 2006 with a prescription for a study drug. Results Prevalence of prescribing averaged across all ages increased 6.23-fold over the study period. Overall, prevalence decreased with age: in 2006, prevalence in males dropped 95% from 12.77 per 1000 in 15-year-olds to 0.64 per 1000 in 21-year-olds. A longitudinal analysis of a cohort of 44 patients aged 15 years in 1999 demonstrated that no patient received treatment after the age of 21 years. Conclusions The prevalence of prescribing by general practitioners to patients with ADHD drops significantly from age 15 to age 21 years. The fall in prescribing is greater than the reported age-related decrease in symptoms, raising the possibility that treatment is prematurely discontinued in some young adults in whom symptoms persist.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Psychiatry, 2009, v. 194 n. 3, p. 273-277 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.107.045245
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10243264
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.107.045245
 
dc.identifier.eissn1472-1465
 
dc.identifier.epage277
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000264387100013
 
dc.identifier.issn0007-1250
2013 Impact Factor: 7.343
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.pmid19252159
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-62149108195
 
dc.identifier.spage273
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171377
 
dc.identifier.volume194
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherRoyal College of Psychiatrists. The Journal's web site is located at http://bjp.rcpsych.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Psychiatry
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAttention Deficit Disorder With Hyperactivity - Drug Therapy
 
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies
 
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studies
 
dc.subject.meshDextroamphetamine - Therapeutic Use
 
dc.subject.meshDopamine Uptake Inhibitors - Therapeutic Use
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMethylphenidate - Therapeutic Use
 
dc.subject.meshPhysician's Practice Patterns - Trends
 
dc.subject.meshPrevalence
 
dc.subject.meshPropylamines - Therapeutic Use
 
dc.subject.meshWithholding Treatment - Trends
 
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
 
dc.titleAttention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: Treatment discontinuation in adolescents and young adults
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Coghill, D</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Hollis, C</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Murray, M</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Potts, L</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Sayal, K</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>De Soysa, R</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Taylor, E</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. University of Dundee College of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing
  2. King's College London
  3. Medical Research Council
  4. Royal Liverpool Children's NHS Trust
  5. School of Community Health Sciences
  6. UCL Institute of Child Health
  7. Medicines and Health Care products Regulatory Agency