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Article: Parenteral drug administration errors by nursing staff on an acute medical admissions ward during day duty

TitleParenteral drug administration errors by nursing staff on an acute medical admissions ward during day duty
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherAdis International Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://drugsafety.adisonline.com/
Citation
Drug Safety, 2001, v. 24 n. 11, p. 855-862 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Parenteral therapy is a route of administration for drugs which are poorly absorbed via the oral route and it can provide a rapid response during an emergency. However, poorly prepared and/or administered parenteral therapy can cause potential harm to patients such as thrombus formation, severe hypersensitivity reactions and infection. Very few studies have investigated the incidence of medication errors associated with parenteral drug administration. Objectives: To determine the error rate during preparation and administration of parenteral medications by nursing staff and to propose strategies to reduce the error rate during parenteral administration. Methods: A direct, disguised observation technique was used. The first author (JB) observed and recorded errors that occurred during the preparation and administration of parenteral medications on an admissions ward between 8.00am and 4.30pm from Monday to Friday for a 4-week period during December 1998. The staff were told that the observer was timing the administration; therefore they were not aware of the true nature of the study. This study was approved by the hospital audit committee. Results: Drug administration was witnessed for a 4-week period providing 107 opportunities for error. 27 errors were observed which equated to an error rate of 25.2% [95% confidence interval (CI) 17.0 to 33.5%] including wrong time errors. Excluding wrong time errors, the most frequently occurring type of error, reduced the error rate to 10.3% (95% CI 3.8 to 14.9%). Discussion: The error rate was lower than reported in the literature, this may be due to different methodologies, small sample size or effective nursing training and operating procedures. In the observed hospital, only nursing staff who have completed a training package are allowed to administer parenteral medications. Conclusion: Based on our small study, and 2 previous small studies, we can conclude that parenteral medication administration errors are common in the UK; however, these studies are too small-scale to detect rare and serious errors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171255
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.206
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.359
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBruce, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, Ien_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:12:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:12:59Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationDrug Safety, 2001, v. 24 n. 11, p. 855-862en_US
dc.identifier.issn0114-5916en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/171255-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Parenteral therapy is a route of administration for drugs which are poorly absorbed via the oral route and it can provide a rapid response during an emergency. However, poorly prepared and/or administered parenteral therapy can cause potential harm to patients such as thrombus formation, severe hypersensitivity reactions and infection. Very few studies have investigated the incidence of medication errors associated with parenteral drug administration. Objectives: To determine the error rate during preparation and administration of parenteral medications by nursing staff and to propose strategies to reduce the error rate during parenteral administration. Methods: A direct, disguised observation technique was used. The first author (JB) observed and recorded errors that occurred during the preparation and administration of parenteral medications on an admissions ward between 8.00am and 4.30pm from Monday to Friday for a 4-week period during December 1998. The staff were told that the observer was timing the administration; therefore they were not aware of the true nature of the study. This study was approved by the hospital audit committee. Results: Drug administration was witnessed for a 4-week period providing 107 opportunities for error. 27 errors were observed which equated to an error rate of 25.2% [95% confidence interval (CI) 17.0 to 33.5%] including wrong time errors. Excluding wrong time errors, the most frequently occurring type of error, reduced the error rate to 10.3% (95% CI 3.8 to 14.9%). Discussion: The error rate was lower than reported in the literature, this may be due to different methodologies, small sample size or effective nursing training and operating procedures. In the observed hospital, only nursing staff who have completed a training package are allowed to administer parenteral medications. Conclusion: Based on our small study, and 2 previous small studies, we can conclude that parenteral medication administration errors are common in the UK; however, these studies are too small-scale to detect rare and serious errors.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAdis International Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://drugsafety.adisonline.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofDrug Safetyen_US
dc.subject.meshCross Infection - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshData Collectionen_US
dc.subject.meshDrug Therapy - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshGreat Britainen_US
dc.subject.meshHospital Unitsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfusions, Parenteral - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshMedication Errors - Nursing - Standards - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshMedication Systems, Hospital - Standards - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshNursing Staff, Hospital - Standards - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshObservation - Methodsen_US
dc.titleParenteral drug administration errors by nursing staff on an acute medical admissions ward during day dutyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, I:wongick@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, I=rp01480en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2165/00002018-200124110-00006-
dc.identifier.pmid11665872-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034783728en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034783728&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume24en_US
dc.identifier.issue11en_US
dc.identifier.spage855en_US
dc.identifier.epage862en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000171407100006-
dc.publisher.placeNew Zealanden_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBruce, J=17338007300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, I=7102513915en_US

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