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Article: Is nitric oxide the only endothelium-derived relaxing factor in canine femoral veins?

TitleIs nitric oxide the only endothelium-derived relaxing factor in canine femoral veins?
Authors
Issue Date1989
PublisherAmerican Physiological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://ajpcon.physiology.org/
Citation
American Journal Of Physiology - Heart And Circulatory Physiology, 1989, v. 257 n. 6, p. 26/6 How to Cite?
AbstractNitric oxide may be an endothelium-derived relaxing factor in systemic arteries and pulmonary veins. The endothelium-derived relaxing factor of systemic veins has not been characterized. Experiments were designed to determine whether the endothelium-derived relaxing factor of systemic veins shared chemical properties and mechanisms of action with nitric oxide. Rings of the canine femoral vein with and without endothelium were suspended in organ chambers for the measurement of isometric force. In rings without endothelium, relaxations to nitric oxide were augmented by superoxide dismutase plus catalase and were inhibited by hemoglobin, methylene blue, and LY 83583. The endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine and A23187 were not augmented by superoxide dismutase plus catalase but were inhibited by hemoglobin and only moderately reduced by either methylene blue or LY 83583. Relaxations to sodium nitroprusside were not inhibited by methylene blue and LY 83583. Relaxations to sodium nitroprusside were inhibited by ouabain and K+-free solution; those to nitric oxide were not. These results indicate that although the endothelium-derived relaxing factor released from canine systemic veins shares some chemical properties with nitric oxide, the mechanism by which relaxations are induced by the two differ. A factor dissimilar to nitric oxide but acting like sodium nitroprusside may be released by the endothelium of canine systemic veins.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170960
ISSN
1998 Impact Factor: 3.077
2004 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.102

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMiller, VMen_US
dc.contributor.authorVanhoutte, PMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:11:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:11:37Z-
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Physiology - Heart And Circulatory Physiology, 1989, v. 257 n. 6, p. 26/6en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-9513en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170960-
dc.description.abstractNitric oxide may be an endothelium-derived relaxing factor in systemic arteries and pulmonary veins. The endothelium-derived relaxing factor of systemic veins has not been characterized. Experiments were designed to determine whether the endothelium-derived relaxing factor of systemic veins shared chemical properties and mechanisms of action with nitric oxide. Rings of the canine femoral vein with and without endothelium were suspended in organ chambers for the measurement of isometric force. In rings without endothelium, relaxations to nitric oxide were augmented by superoxide dismutase plus catalase and were inhibited by hemoglobin, methylene blue, and LY 83583. The endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine and A23187 were not augmented by superoxide dismutase plus catalase but were inhibited by hemoglobin and only moderately reduced by either methylene blue or LY 83583. Relaxations to sodium nitroprusside were not inhibited by methylene blue and LY 83583. Relaxations to sodium nitroprusside were inhibited by ouabain and K+-free solution; those to nitric oxide were not. These results indicate that although the endothelium-derived relaxing factor released from canine systemic veins shares some chemical properties with nitric oxide, the mechanism by which relaxations are induced by the two differ. A factor dissimilar to nitric oxide but acting like sodium nitroprusside may be released by the endothelium of canine systemic veins.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Physiological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://ajpcon.physiology.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAcetylcholine - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAminoquinolines - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshCalcimycin - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCatalase - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDinoprost - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDogsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemoral Vein - Drug Effects - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHemoglobins - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshIndomethacin - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMethylene Blue - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Smooth, Vascular - Drug Effects - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshNitric Oxide - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshNorepinephrine - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshOuabain - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPotassium - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSrs-A - Antagonists & Inhibitorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSuperoxide Dismutase - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshVasodilation - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.titleIs nitric oxide the only endothelium-derived relaxing factor in canine femoral veins?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailVanhoutte, PM:vanhoutt@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityVanhoutte, PM=rp00238en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid2513730-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0024785882en_US
dc.identifier.volume257en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage26/6en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMiller, VM=7201476816en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVanhoutte, PM=7202304247en_US

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