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Article: Influence of sex difference and oral contraceptives on forearm reactive hyperemia

TitleInfluence of sex difference and oral contraceptives on forearm reactive hyperemia
Authors
Issue Date1981
PublisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/JVR
Citation
Blood Vessels, 1981, v. 18 n. 4-5, p. 161-170 How to Cite?
AbstractExperiments were performed on normal male and female subjects to compare blood flow responses following release of an arterial occlusion (reactive hyperemia). Additionally, the effects of oral contraceptive therapy on the reactive hyperemia reaction were studied in female subjects. Forearm blood flow was measured with a strain-gauge plethysmograph, heart rate with an electrocardiograph, and mean arterial pressure was measured by auscultation. Blood flow was determined before and after circulatory arrest of 1, 3, and 5 min. Blood serum levels of 17β-estradiol, progesterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) were measured by radioimmunoassay. The mean resting forearm blood flow was similar in males and females (~4 ml/100 ml/min). There were no significant changes in systemic mean arterial pressure or heart rate during the experiments. Following 1 min of arterial occlusion, the peak blood flow responses were similar in males and females. The peak blood flow responses following release of arterial occlusion were lower in males than in untreated females at occlusion intervals of 3 and 5 min. Females receiving oral contraceptives showed reduced peak blood flow responses after circulatory arrest of either 3 or 5 min as compared to untreated females. There were no significant differences in the recovery times of the hyperemic responses between males and females following any of the periods of occlusion. The peak blood flow responses following 3 min of arterial occlusion were significantly correlated with the blood serum levels of 17β-estradiol, LH and FSH, but not with the blood serum levels of progesterone. These results suggest that: (1) sex difference has a marked effect on the blood flow response following arterial occlusion, and (2) hormonal changes influence vascular responsiveness in the female.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170641
ISSN
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWebb, RCen_US
dc.contributor.authorRusch, NJen_US
dc.contributor.authorVanhoutte, PMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:10:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:10:16Z-
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.identifier.citationBlood Vessels, 1981, v. 18 n. 4-5, p. 161-170en_US
dc.identifier.issn0303-6847en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170641-
dc.description.abstractExperiments were performed on normal male and female subjects to compare blood flow responses following release of an arterial occlusion (reactive hyperemia). Additionally, the effects of oral contraceptive therapy on the reactive hyperemia reaction were studied in female subjects. Forearm blood flow was measured with a strain-gauge plethysmograph, heart rate with an electrocardiograph, and mean arterial pressure was measured by auscultation. Blood flow was determined before and after circulatory arrest of 1, 3, and 5 min. Blood serum levels of 17β-estradiol, progesterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) were measured by radioimmunoassay. The mean resting forearm blood flow was similar in males and females (~4 ml/100 ml/min). There were no significant changes in systemic mean arterial pressure or heart rate during the experiments. Following 1 min of arterial occlusion, the peak blood flow responses were similar in males and females. The peak blood flow responses following release of arterial occlusion were lower in males than in untreated females at occlusion intervals of 3 and 5 min. Females receiving oral contraceptives showed reduced peak blood flow responses after circulatory arrest of either 3 or 5 min as compared to untreated females. There were no significant differences in the recovery times of the hyperemic responses between males and females following any of the periods of occlusion. The peak blood flow responses following 3 min of arterial occlusion were significantly correlated with the blood serum levels of 17β-estradiol, LH and FSH, but not with the blood serum levels of progesterone. These results suggest that: (1) sex difference has a marked effect on the blood flow response following arterial occlusion, and (2) hormonal changes influence vascular responsiveness in the female.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/JVRen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBlood Vesselsen_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressureen_US
dc.subject.meshContraceptives, Oral - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEstradiol - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollicle Stimulating Hormone - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshForearm - Blood Supplyen_US
dc.subject.meshHeart Rateen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshHyperemia - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshLuteinizing Hormone - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshProgesterone - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshRegional Blood Flow - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.titleInfluence of sex difference and oral contraceptives on forearm reactive hyperemiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailVanhoutte, PM:vanhoutt@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityVanhoutte, PM=rp00238en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid6794679-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0019453462en_US
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issue4-5en_US
dc.identifier.spage161en_US
dc.identifier.epage170en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1981LY82500003-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebb, RC=6603072737en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRusch, NJ=7005728816en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVanhoutte, PM=7202304247en_US

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