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Article: The effect of profound cooling on adrenergic neurotransmission in canine cutaneous veins

TitleThe effect of profound cooling on adrenergic neurotransmission in canine cutaneous veins
Authors
Issue Date1981
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0022-3751
Citation
Journal Of Physiology, 1981, v. Vol. 311, p. 57-65 How to Cite?
AbstractExperiments were performed to investigate how profound cooling affects adrenergic neurotransmission and vascular smooth muscle reactivity in isolated saphenous veins of the dog. Cooling from 37 to 5°C caused progressive depression of the contractile responses to high K+ solutions, illustrating the direct inhibitory effect of cooling on depolarization-induced contraction of the venous smooth muscle cells. During prolonged cooling to 20, 15 and 10°c, the contractile response to exogenous norepinephrine (10-8-10-6M) was augmented compared to that at 37°C. At 5°C responses up to 10-7 M were also augmented, but those at higher concentrations were depressed. When veins contracted with 2 x 10-6 M-norepinephrine were cooled to 20, 15, 10 and 5°C, there was a further increase in tension; this increase slowly subsided to control values at 5°C but was sustained at the other temperatures. Cooling to 20 and 15°C augmented the contraction caused by low but not high frequencies of electrical stimulation of the adrenergic nerve endings. Further cooling to 10°C depressed, and at 5°C abolished the response, demonstrating that profound cooling interrupted adrenergic neurotransmission. In rings stimulated electrically at a low frequency (0.5 Hz), warming from 7 to 9°C or from 9 to 11°C, caused marked increases in tension. This may be explained by the combination of resumption of adrenergic neurotransmission and the increased responsiveness of the cutaneous venous smooth muscle cells to noradrenaline. The combination of enhanced affinity for noradrenaline combined with inhibition of neurotransmitter disposition probably permits the cutaneous veins to remain constricted during exposure to severe cold.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170628
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.731
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.670
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRusch, NJen_US
dc.contributor.authorShepherd, JTen_US
dc.contributor.authorVanhoutte, PMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:10:13Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:10:13Z-
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Physiology, 1981, v. Vol. 311, p. 57-65en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-3751en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170628-
dc.description.abstractExperiments were performed to investigate how profound cooling affects adrenergic neurotransmission and vascular smooth muscle reactivity in isolated saphenous veins of the dog. Cooling from 37 to 5°C caused progressive depression of the contractile responses to high K+ solutions, illustrating the direct inhibitory effect of cooling on depolarization-induced contraction of the venous smooth muscle cells. During prolonged cooling to 20, 15 and 10°c, the contractile response to exogenous norepinephrine (10-8-10-6M) was augmented compared to that at 37°C. At 5°C responses up to 10-7 M were also augmented, but those at higher concentrations were depressed. When veins contracted with 2 x 10-6 M-norepinephrine were cooled to 20, 15, 10 and 5°C, there was a further increase in tension; this increase slowly subsided to control values at 5°C but was sustained at the other temperatures. Cooling to 20 and 15°C augmented the contraction caused by low but not high frequencies of electrical stimulation of the adrenergic nerve endings. Further cooling to 10°C depressed, and at 5°C abolished the response, demonstrating that profound cooling interrupted adrenergic neurotransmission. In rings stimulated electrically at a low frequency (0.5 Hz), warming from 7 to 9°C or from 9 to 11°C, caused marked increases in tension. This may be explained by the combination of resumption of adrenergic neurotransmission and the increased responsiveness of the cutaneous venous smooth muscle cells to noradrenaline. The combination of enhanced affinity for noradrenaline combined with inhibition of neurotransmitter disposition probably permits the cutaneous veins to remain constricted during exposure to severe cold.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0022-3751en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshCold Temperatureen_US
dc.subject.meshDogsen_US
dc.subject.meshElectric Stimulationen_US
dc.subject.meshMuscle Contraction - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Smooth, Vascular - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshNorepinephrine - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPotassium - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Adrenergic - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Adrenergic, Alpha - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSaphenous Vein - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshSkin - Innervationen_US
dc.subject.meshSynaptic Transmissionen_US
dc.titleThe effect of profound cooling on adrenergic neurotransmission in canine cutaneous veinsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailVanHoutte, PM:vanhoutt@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityVanHoutte, PM=rp00238en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid6267258-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0019390482en_US
dc.identifier.volumeVol. 311en_US
dc.identifier.spage57en_US
dc.identifier.epage65en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1981LC05100004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRusch, NJ=7005728816en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShepherd, JT=7401742522en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVanHoutte, PM=7202304247en_US

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