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Article: Cholinergic inhibition of adrenergic neurotransmission in the canine gastric artery

TitleCholinergic inhibition of adrenergic neurotransmission in the canine gastric artery
Authors
Issue Date1978
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastro
Citation
Gastroenterology, 1978, v. 74 n. 6, p. 1266-1270 How to Cite?
AbstractExperiments were performed to examine the possible interaction between the cholinergic transmitter and the reactivity of gastric arteries to adrenergic activation. Helical strips of dogs' gastric arteries were mounted for automatic tension recording. The strips contracted on exposure to norepinephrine; these contractions were inhibited by phenoxybenzamine. Electrical stimulation caused an increase in tension, which was abolished by tetrodotoxin and phenoxybenzamine. indicating that electrical stimulation causes contraction by liberation of norepinephrine. Acetylcholine did not alter basal tension; it caused relaxation during responses to electrical stimulation, but not during those to norepinephrine. The relaxation caused by acetylcholine was abolished by atropine. This indicates that acetylcholine inhibits adrenergic neurotransmission in the dog's gastric artery. When added during electrical stimulation, atropine caused an increase in tension. The same concentrations of atropine did not affect basal tension or the response to norepinephrine. Physostigmine depresses the response to electrical stimulation, but not that to norepinephrine. In the blood-perfused stomach of the intact dog, vagal stimulation depressed vasoconstrictions caused by sympathetic nerve stimulation more than comparable constrictor responses obtained with the infusion of norepinephrine. These experiments suggest that liberated acetylcholine can modulate adrenergic neurotransmission in the gastric blood vessels. The removal of cholinergic inhibition on the release of norepinephrine may help explain why vagotomy has a beneficial effect on gastric bleeding.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170551
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 18.187
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 7.170
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVan Hee, RHen_US
dc.contributor.authorVanhoutte, PMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:09:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:09:54Z-
dc.date.issued1978en_US
dc.identifier.citationGastroenterology, 1978, v. 74 n. 6, p. 1266-1270en_US
dc.identifier.issn0016-5085en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170551-
dc.description.abstractExperiments were performed to examine the possible interaction between the cholinergic transmitter and the reactivity of gastric arteries to adrenergic activation. Helical strips of dogs' gastric arteries were mounted for automatic tension recording. The strips contracted on exposure to norepinephrine; these contractions were inhibited by phenoxybenzamine. Electrical stimulation caused an increase in tension, which was abolished by tetrodotoxin and phenoxybenzamine. indicating that electrical stimulation causes contraction by liberation of norepinephrine. Acetylcholine did not alter basal tension; it caused relaxation during responses to electrical stimulation, but not during those to norepinephrine. The relaxation caused by acetylcholine was abolished by atropine. This indicates that acetylcholine inhibits adrenergic neurotransmission in the dog's gastric artery. When added during electrical stimulation, atropine caused an increase in tension. The same concentrations of atropine did not affect basal tension or the response to norepinephrine. Physostigmine depresses the response to electrical stimulation, but not that to norepinephrine. In the blood-perfused stomach of the intact dog, vagal stimulation depressed vasoconstrictions caused by sympathetic nerve stimulation more than comparable constrictor responses obtained with the infusion of norepinephrine. These experiments suggest that liberated acetylcholine can modulate adrenergic neurotransmission in the gastric blood vessels. The removal of cholinergic inhibition on the release of norepinephrine may help explain why vagotomy has a beneficial effect on gastric bleeding.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastroen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGastroenterologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAcetylcholine - Pharmacology - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshArteries - Innervationen_US
dc.subject.meshAtropine - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDogsen_US
dc.subject.meshIsoproterenol - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshNeural Inhibition - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshNorepinephrine - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhenoxybenzamine - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysostigmine - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshStomach - Blood Supplyen_US
dc.subject.meshSympathetic Nervous System - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSynaptic Transmissionen_US
dc.subject.meshVagotomyen_US
dc.subject.meshVagus Nerve - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshVasoconstrictionen_US
dc.subject.meshVasomotor System - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleCholinergic inhibition of adrenergic neurotransmission in the canine gastric arteryen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailVanhoutte, PM:vanhoutt@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityVanhoutte, PM=rp00238en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid206482-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0017871663en_US
dc.identifier.volume74en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage1266en_US
dc.identifier.epage1270en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1978FB64900015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVan Hee, RH=16164638400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVanhoutte, PM=7202304247en_US

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