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Article: Nature of endothelium-derived relaxing factor: Are there two relaxing mediators?

TitleNature of endothelium-derived relaxing factor: Are there two relaxing mediators?
Authors
Issue Date1987
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://circres.ahajournals.org
Citation
Circulation Research, 1987, v. 61 n. 5 II SUPPL., p. II-61-II-67 How to Cite?
AbstractThe role of arachidonic acid in forming endothelium-derived relaxing factor remains controversial. This controversy may be explained if more than one factor exists. To test this hypothesis, the effects of various inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism were studied. The perfusate from canine femoral arteries with endothelium was bioassayed with coronary artery rings without endothelium. Treatment of the perfused segment (but not the bioassay ring) with inhibitors of phospholipase A2 (quinacrine) or cytochrome P450 (metyrapone) had no effect on the basal relaxing activity of the effluent; treatment with the inhibitor of lipoxygenase, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, significantly depressed it. With increasing concentrations of acetylcholine, a biphasic concentration-relaxation curve was obtained; the enzyme inhibitors depressed or prevented the first phase but affect the second phase. Infusion of arachidonic acid or soybean lipoxidase directly on the bioassay ring did not cause relaxation; together, they evoked concentration-dependent relaxations. These data suggest that acetylcholine can trigger the release of two chemically different relaxing mediators from the endothelium of the canine femoral artery. One factor may be a product of lipoxygenase (or epoxigenase). The second factor is not a metabolite of arachidonic acid and may be released under basal conditions. The existence of two (or more) chemically different endothelium-derived mediators may help to explain the controversial data regarding the nature of the factor(s).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170472
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 11.551
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.755

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRubanyi, GMen_US
dc.contributor.authorVanhoutte, PMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:09:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:09:37Z-
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.identifier.citationCirculation Research, 1987, v. 61 n. 5 II SUPPL., p. II-61-II-67en_US
dc.identifier.issn0009-7330en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170472-
dc.description.abstractThe role of arachidonic acid in forming endothelium-derived relaxing factor remains controversial. This controversy may be explained if more than one factor exists. To test this hypothesis, the effects of various inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism were studied. The perfusate from canine femoral arteries with endothelium was bioassayed with coronary artery rings without endothelium. Treatment of the perfused segment (but not the bioassay ring) with inhibitors of phospholipase A2 (quinacrine) or cytochrome P450 (metyrapone) had no effect on the basal relaxing activity of the effluent; treatment with the inhibitor of lipoxygenase, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, significantly depressed it. With increasing concentrations of acetylcholine, a biphasic concentration-relaxation curve was obtained; the enzyme inhibitors depressed or prevented the first phase but affect the second phase. Infusion of arachidonic acid or soybean lipoxidase directly on the bioassay ring did not cause relaxation; together, they evoked concentration-dependent relaxations. These data suggest that acetylcholine can trigger the release of two chemically different relaxing mediators from the endothelium of the canine femoral artery. One factor may be a product of lipoxygenase (or epoxigenase). The second factor is not a metabolite of arachidonic acid and may be released under basal conditions. The existence of two (or more) chemically different endothelium-derived mediators may help to explain the controversial data regarding the nature of the factor(s).en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://circres.ahajournals.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCirculation Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAcetylcholine - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshArachidonic Aciden_US
dc.subject.meshArachidonic Acids - Antagonists & Inhibitors - Metabolism - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBiological Agents - Metabolism - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBiological Assayen_US
dc.subject.meshCoronary Vessels - Drug Effects - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCytochrome P-450 Enzyme System - Antagonists & Inhibitorsen_US
dc.subject.meshDogsen_US
dc.subject.meshEndothelium - Drug Effects - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshLipoxygenase - Metabolism - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshLipoxygenase Inhibitorsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMetyrapone - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMuscle Relaxation - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshNitric Oxideen_US
dc.subject.meshNordihydroguaiaretic Acid - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhospholipases A - Antagonists & Inhibitorsen_US
dc.subject.meshPhospholipases A2en_US
dc.subject.meshQuinacrine - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.titleNature of endothelium-derived relaxing factor: Are there two relaxing mediators?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailVanhoutte, PM:vanhoutt@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityVanhoutte, PM=rp00238en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid3117406-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0012939643en_US
dc.identifier.volume61en_US
dc.identifier.issue5 II SUPPL.en_US
dc.identifier.spageIIen_US
dc.identifier.epage61en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRubanyi, GM=7005517991en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVanhoutte, PM=7202304247en_US

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