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Article: China engages global health governance: Processes and dilemmas

TitleChina engages global health governance: Processes and dilemmas
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/17441692.asp
Citation
Global Public Health, 2009, v. 4 n. 1, p. 1-30 How to Cite?
AbstractUsing HIV/AIDS, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), and avian influenza as case studies, this paper discusses the processes and dilemmas of China's participation in health governance, both at the domestic level and the global level. Globalization has eroded the boundary between public and private health and between domestic and global health governance. In addition, the SARS outbreak of 2002-2003 focused global attention on China's public health. As a rising power with the largest population on earth, China is expected by the international community to play a better and more active role in health management. Since the turn of this century, China has increasingly embraced multilateralism in health governance. This paper argues that China's multilateral cooperation is driven by both necessity and conscious design. International concerns about good governance and its aspiration to become a 'responsible' state have exerted a normative effect on China to change tack. Its interactions with United Nations agencies have triggered a learning process for China to securitize the spread of infectious diseases as a security threat. Conversely, China has utilized multilateralism to gain access to international resources and technical assistance. It is still a matter of debate whether China's cooperative engagement with global health governance can endure, because of the persistent problems of withholding information on disease outbreaks and because of its insistence on the Westphalian notion of sovereignty.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170410
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.978
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.912
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, LHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, PKen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, Gen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:08:14Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:08:14Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationGlobal Public Health, 2009, v. 4 n. 1, p. 1-30en_US
dc.identifier.issn1744-1692en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170410-
dc.description.abstractUsing HIV/AIDS, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), and avian influenza as case studies, this paper discusses the processes and dilemmas of China's participation in health governance, both at the domestic level and the global level. Globalization has eroded the boundary between public and private health and between domestic and global health governance. In addition, the SARS outbreak of 2002-2003 focused global attention on China's public health. As a rising power with the largest population on earth, China is expected by the international community to play a better and more active role in health management. Since the turn of this century, China has increasingly embraced multilateralism in health governance. This paper argues that China's multilateral cooperation is driven by both necessity and conscious design. International concerns about good governance and its aspiration to become a 'responsible' state have exerted a normative effect on China to change tack. Its interactions with United Nations agencies have triggered a learning process for China to securitize the spread of infectious diseases as a security threat. Conversely, China has utilized multilateralism to gain access to international resources and technical assistance. It is still a matter of debate whether China's cooperative engagement with global health governance can endure, because of the persistent problems of withholding information on disease outbreaks and because of its insistence on the Westphalian notion of sovereignty.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/17441692.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal Public Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBirdsen_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDelivery Of Health Careen_US
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaksen_US
dc.subject.meshHiv Infections - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H5n1 Subtypeen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza In Birds - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshInternational Cooperationen_US
dc.subject.meshPublic Health Administrationen_US
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshWorld Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshWorld Health Organizationen_US
dc.titleChina engages global health governance: Processes and dilemmasen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, G:gcfchan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, G=rp00431en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17441690701524471en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19153928-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-58249133656en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-58249133656&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume4en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage1en_US
dc.identifier.epage30en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000207893800001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.f10001148917-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, LH=35333504700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, PK=23469415400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, G=16160154400en_US

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