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Article: (v) Molecular and cellular biology of the intervertebral disc and the use of animal models

Title(v) Molecular and cellular biology of the intervertebral disc and the use of animal models
Authors
Keywordsanimal models
cell biology
degeneration
Intervertebral disc
molecular biology
Issue Date2008
PublisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cuor
Citation
Current Orthopaedics, 2008, v. 22 n. 4, p. 267-273 How to Cite?
AbstractNumerous in vivo animal models for intervertebral disc (IVD) research have been developed and now play an important role in promoting our understanding of normal disc biology, degeneration and potential therapeutic mechanisms. Heterogeneous cell types occur in the IVD, which have to adapt to an environment rather unique to the body in several senses, being exposed to severe hypoxia, high mechanic loading and hyperomostic pressure. IVD cells therefore must have specific mechanisms activated to adapt themselves to function in such harsh conditions. The most prominent change observed during IVD degeneration is the progressive loss of proteoglycan, water, and collagen II in the nucleus pulposus (NP) matrix. Most of these alterations can be attributed to cellular changes, including the decline in cell abundance and functionality and a shift of cells with chondrocytic phenotype to a fibrocytic phenotype. It is widely recognized that local environmental conditions within the degenerative disc, including nutrient supply, anabolic/catabolic factors, the responsiveness of functional cells and availability of supportive cells, and matrix scaffold, are factors that should be considered important when designing a therapeutic approach. Whereas future work will still require animal models to answer specific questions, their relevance to disc degeneration in patients with discogenic pain will now need to be carefully justified. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170131
ISSN
2008 Impact Factor: 0.288
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhou, GQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, VVLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:05:29Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:05:29Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCurrent Orthopaedics, 2008, v. 22 n. 4, p. 267-273en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0268-0890en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170131-
dc.description.abstractNumerous in vivo animal models for intervertebral disc (IVD) research have been developed and now play an important role in promoting our understanding of normal disc biology, degeneration and potential therapeutic mechanisms. Heterogeneous cell types occur in the IVD, which have to adapt to an environment rather unique to the body in several senses, being exposed to severe hypoxia, high mechanic loading and hyperomostic pressure. IVD cells therefore must have specific mechanisms activated to adapt themselves to function in such harsh conditions. The most prominent change observed during IVD degeneration is the progressive loss of proteoglycan, water, and collagen II in the nucleus pulposus (NP) matrix. Most of these alterations can be attributed to cellular changes, including the decline in cell abundance and functionality and a shift of cells with chondrocytic phenotype to a fibrocytic phenotype. It is widely recognized that local environmental conditions within the degenerative disc, including nutrient supply, anabolic/catabolic factors, the responsiveness of functional cells and availability of supportive cells, and matrix scaffold, are factors that should be considered important when designing a therapeutic approach. Whereas future work will still require animal models to answer specific questions, their relevance to disc degeneration in patients with discogenic pain will now need to be carefully justified. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cuoren_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent Orthopaedicsen_HK
dc.subjectanimal modelsen_HK
dc.subjectcell biologyen_HK
dc.subjectdegenerationen_HK
dc.subjectIntervertebral discen_HK
dc.subjectmolecular biologyen_HK
dc.title(v) Molecular and cellular biology of the intervertebral disc and the use of animal modelsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhou, GQ: wormoscz@gmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, VVL: vicleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KMC: cheungmc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhou, GQ=rp00527en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, VVL=rp01764en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, KMC=rp00387en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cuor.2008.05.008en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-51249085196en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-51249085196&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume22en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage267en_HK
dc.identifier.epage273en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000260098200005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, GQ=23394245100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, F=35354574000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, VVL=24504145500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, KMC=7402406754en_HK

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