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Article: Effect of torsion on microarterial anastomosis patency

TitleEffect of torsion on microarterial anastomosis patency
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/35757
Citation
Microsurgery, 2003, v. 23 n. 1, p. 56-59 How to Cite?
AbstractAll kinds of technical faults must be prevented in microvascular anastomosis for successful reconstructive microsurgery. Torsion at the anastomosis site is one of the most basic technical errors. In this study, we investigate the effect of different degrees of microarterial torsion on patency and its physical changes on anastomosis in a rat model. A total of 144 microanastomosis were performed in 72 Sprague-Dawley rats. They were divided into 9 groups. The anastomosis was performed at 0°, 45°, 90°, 135°, 180°, 225°, 270°, 315°, and 360° of torsion randomly. Patency rates and the narrowest point of the artery after the anastomosis were recorded after 1 hour for each group. In the second stage of the study, the 9 groups were divided into 2 groups for patency rates and histopathological sampling at the second and seventh days postoperatively. The femoral arteries in all groups were all patent at the end of 1 hour. Only 5 microanastomosis were thrombosed (one in the 45° group, one in the 225° group, one in the 270° group, and two in the 315° group) at the second day of exploration. Only two arteries were thrombosed (one in the 45° group and one in the 315° group) at the seventh day of exploration. The patency rate was 96.8% in experimental groups excluding the control group. Different degrees of torsion had no statistically significant effect on the patency rates of microvascular anastomosis. Torsional repair of the femoral artery in the rat has no significant histopathologic changes, but alternately, endothelial integrity was affected by excessive degrees of torsion. Different degrees of torsion at the anastomosis site do not affect patency rates and cross sectional histology of rat femoral arteries. In clinical practice, minor torsion can be tolerated, however, factors affecting patency such as tension, diameter disproportion, and tight closure can affect the final result of anastomosis. We observed that torsional force of the vessel is distributed along the artery to the weakest point. © 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170048
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.054
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.392
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTopalan, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorBilgin, SSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorIp, WYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChow, SPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:04:57Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:04:57Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMicrosurgery, 2003, v. 23 n. 1, p. 56-59en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0738-1085en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170048-
dc.description.abstractAll kinds of technical faults must be prevented in microvascular anastomosis for successful reconstructive microsurgery. Torsion at the anastomosis site is one of the most basic technical errors. In this study, we investigate the effect of different degrees of microarterial torsion on patency and its physical changes on anastomosis in a rat model. A total of 144 microanastomosis were performed in 72 Sprague-Dawley rats. They were divided into 9 groups. The anastomosis was performed at 0°, 45°, 90°, 135°, 180°, 225°, 270°, 315°, and 360° of torsion randomly. Patency rates and the narrowest point of the artery after the anastomosis were recorded after 1 hour for each group. In the second stage of the study, the 9 groups were divided into 2 groups for patency rates and histopathological sampling at the second and seventh days postoperatively. The femoral arteries in all groups were all patent at the end of 1 hour. Only 5 microanastomosis were thrombosed (one in the 45° group, one in the 225° group, one in the 270° group, and two in the 315° group) at the second day of exploration. Only two arteries were thrombosed (one in the 45° group and one in the 315° group) at the seventh day of exploration. The patency rate was 96.8% in experimental groups excluding the control group. Different degrees of torsion had no statistically significant effect on the patency rates of microvascular anastomosis. Torsional repair of the femoral artery in the rat has no significant histopathologic changes, but alternately, endothelial integrity was affected by excessive degrees of torsion. Different degrees of torsion at the anastomosis site do not affect patency rates and cross sectional histology of rat femoral arteries. In clinical practice, minor torsion can be tolerated, however, factors affecting patency such as tension, diameter disproportion, and tight closure can affect the final result of anastomosis. We observed that torsional force of the vessel is distributed along the artery to the weakest point. © 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/35757en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMicrosurgeryen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnastomosis, Surgical - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFemoral Artery - Pathology - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshImmunohistochemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMicrosurgery - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Animalen_US
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Perioden_US
dc.subject.meshRandom Allocationen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshRats, Sprague-Dawleyen_US
dc.subject.meshSensitivity And Specificityen_US
dc.subject.meshTensile Strengthen_US
dc.subject.meshTorsion Abnormality - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshVascular Patency - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshVascular Surgical Procedures - Methodsen_US
dc.titleEffect of torsion on microarterial anastomosis patencyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailIp, WY: wyip@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChow, SP: spchow@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityIp, WY=rp00401en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChow, SP=rp00064en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/micr.10092en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12616520-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037287809en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037287809&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume23en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage56en_HK
dc.identifier.epage59en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000181384900012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTopalan, M=6701722841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBilgin, SS=7003928582en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIp, WY=35549641700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, SP=7201828376en_HK

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