File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: Traumatic instabilities of the cervical spine caused by high-speed axial compression in a human model: An in vitro biomechanical study
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleTraumatic instabilities of the cervical spine caused by high-speed axial compression in a human model: An in vitro biomechanical study
 
AuthorsZhu, Q1 1
Ouyang, J1
Lu, W2
Lu, H1
Li, Z1
Guo, X1
Zhong, S1
 
Issue Date1999
 
PublisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.com
 
CitationSpine, 1999, v. 24 n. 5, p. 440-444 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00007632-199903010-00006
 
AbstractStudy Design. Traumatic injury of the cervical spine was produced on human cadavers and evaluated with instability tests and radiographs. Objective. To relate traumatic injuries of the cervical spine to instability and patterns of traumatic injury to different levels of impact energy. Summary of Background Data. Data from young human cadavers are rare in traumatic models of the cervical spine, and instabilities caused by axial compression with different impacts remain unknown. Methods. Fourteen cervical spine specimens (C2-C4) obtained from fresh human cadavers were divided evenly into two groups and subjected to axial compressive impact with 30 J and 50 J impact energy, respectively. Pure moments in flexion-extension, left/right lateral bending, and left/right axial rotation were applied to each specimen before and after trauma. The maximum moment was 2.0 Nm in each case. Ranges of motion and neutral zones were measured using stereophotogrammetry. Results. Ranges of motion and neutral zones for both groups increased after trauma. No bony injury was observed on the radiographs after trauma with 30 J, but motions increased significantly in flexion, extension, and axial rotation. All specimens showed bony injuries after trauma with 50 J, whereas motions continued to increase significantly in all directions. The relative neutral zone values were larger than the corresponding range of motion values, except in flexion-extension after trauma with 50 J. Conclusions. The injury patterns of the cervical spine were associated with impact energy, and a high level of impact energy could produce either three-column injury or anterior middle-column injury. Instabilities of the cervical spine caused by compressive trauma increased with the level of impact energy. The neutral zone was more sensitive than the range of motion in representing spinal instability testing was more sensitive than radiographs in evaluating traumatic injury of cervical spine.
 
ISSN0362-2436
2012 Impact Factor: 2.159
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.447
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00007632-199903010-00006
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Q
 
dc.contributor.authorOuyang, J
 
dc.contributor.authorLu, W
 
dc.contributor.authorLu, H
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorGuo, X
 
dc.contributor.authorZhong, S
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T06:04:47Z
 
dc.date.available2012-10-30T06:04:47Z
 
dc.date.issued1999
 
dc.description.abstractStudy Design. Traumatic injury of the cervical spine was produced on human cadavers and evaluated with instability tests and radiographs. Objective. To relate traumatic injuries of the cervical spine to instability and patterns of traumatic injury to different levels of impact energy. Summary of Background Data. Data from young human cadavers are rare in traumatic models of the cervical spine, and instabilities caused by axial compression with different impacts remain unknown. Methods. Fourteen cervical spine specimens (C2-C4) obtained from fresh human cadavers were divided evenly into two groups and subjected to axial compressive impact with 30 J and 50 J impact energy, respectively. Pure moments in flexion-extension, left/right lateral bending, and left/right axial rotation were applied to each specimen before and after trauma. The maximum moment was 2.0 Nm in each case. Ranges of motion and neutral zones were measured using stereophotogrammetry. Results. Ranges of motion and neutral zones for both groups increased after trauma. No bony injury was observed on the radiographs after trauma with 30 J, but motions increased significantly in flexion, extension, and axial rotation. All specimens showed bony injuries after trauma with 50 J, whereas motions continued to increase significantly in all directions. The relative neutral zone values were larger than the corresponding range of motion values, except in flexion-extension after trauma with 50 J. Conclusions. The injury patterns of the cervical spine were associated with impact energy, and a high level of impact energy could produce either three-column injury or anterior middle-column injury. Instabilities of the cervical spine caused by compressive trauma increased with the level of impact energy. The neutral zone was more sensitive than the range of motion in representing spinal instability testing was more sensitive than radiographs in evaluating traumatic injury of cervical spine.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationSpine, 1999, v. 24 n. 5, p. 440-444 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00007632-199903010-00006
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00007632-199903010-00006
 
dc.identifier.epage444
 
dc.identifier.hkuros43499
 
dc.identifier.issn0362-2436
2012 Impact Factor: 2.159
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.447
 
dc.identifier.issue5
 
dc.identifier.pmid10084180
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033104593
 
dc.identifier.spage440
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/170019
 
dc.identifier.volume24
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.com
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofSpine
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAtlanto-Axial Joint - Injuries - Physiopathology - Surgery
 
dc.subject.meshBiomechanics
 
dc.subject.meshCadaver
 
dc.subject.meshCervical Vertebrae - Injuries - Surgery
 
dc.subject.meshFractures, Stress - Complications - Radiography - Surgery
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshJoint Instability - Etiology - Radiography - Surgery
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshModels, Anatomic
 
dc.subject.meshRange Of Motion, Articular
 
dc.subject.meshSpinal Fractures - Complications - Radiography - Surgery
 
dc.titleTraumatic instabilities of the cervical spine caused by high-speed axial compression in a human model: An in vitro biomechanical study
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Zhu, Q</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ouyang, J</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lu, W</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lu, H</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Li, Z</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Guo, X</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zhong, S</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-10-30T06:04:47Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2012-10-30T06:04:47Z</date.available>
<date.issued>1999</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Spine, 1999, v. 24 n. 5, p. 440-444</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>0362-2436</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/170019</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Study Design. Traumatic injury of the cervical spine was produced on human cadavers and evaluated with instability tests and radiographs. Objective. To relate traumatic injuries of the cervical spine to instability and patterns of traumatic injury to different levels of impact energy. Summary of Background Data. Data from young human cadavers are rare in traumatic models of the cervical spine, and instabilities caused by axial compression with different impacts remain unknown. Methods. Fourteen cervical spine specimens (C2-C4) obtained from fresh human cadavers were divided evenly into two groups and subjected to axial compressive impact with 30 J and 50 J impact energy, respectively. Pure moments in flexion-extension, left/right lateral bending, and left/right axial rotation were applied to each specimen before and after trauma. The maximum moment was 2.0 Nm in each case. Ranges of motion and neutral zones were measured using stereophotogrammetry. Results. Ranges of motion and neutral zones for both groups increased after trauma. No bony injury was observed on the radiographs after trauma with 30 J, but motions increased significantly in flexion, extension, and axial rotation. All specimens showed bony injuries after trauma with 50 J, whereas motions continued to increase significantly in all directions. The relative neutral zone values were larger than the corresponding range of motion values, except in flexion-extension after trauma with 50 J. Conclusions. The injury patterns of the cervical spine were associated with impact energy, and a high level of impact energy could produce either three-column injury or anterior middle-column injury. Instabilities of the cervical spine caused by compressive trauma increased with the level of impact energy. The neutral zone was more sensitive than the range of motion in representing spinal instability testing was more sensitive than radiographs in evaluating traumatic injury of cervical spine.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Lippincott, Williams &amp; Wilkins. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.com</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Spine</relation.ispartof>
<subject.mesh>Adult</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Atlanto-Axial Joint - Injuries - Physiopathology - Surgery</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Biomechanics</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Cadaver</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Cervical Vertebrae - Injuries - Surgery</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Fractures, Stress - Complications - Radiography - Surgery</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Humans</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Joint Instability - Etiology - Radiography - Surgery</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Male</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Models, Anatomic</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Range Of Motion, Articular</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Spinal Fractures - Complications - Radiography - Surgery</subject.mesh>
<title>Traumatic instabilities of the cervical spine caused by high-speed axial compression in a human model: An in vitro biomechanical study</title>
<type>Article</type>
<description.nature>Link_to_subscribed_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1097/00007632-199903010-00006</identifier.doi>
<identifier.pmid>10084180</identifier.pmid>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-0033104593</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>43499</identifier.hkuros>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033104593&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>24</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>5</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>440</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>444</identifier.epage>
<publisher.place>United States</publisher.place>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. Southern Medical University
  2. The University of Hong Kong