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Article: The disengaged academic: The retreat from citizenship

TitleThe disengaged academic: The retreat from citizenship
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/HEQU
Citation
Higher Education Quarterly, 2005, v. 59 n. 4, p. 296 - 312 How to Cite?
AbstractCitizenship education has developed against the backdrop of civic disengagement. However, as attention has focused on the incorporation of citizenship education into the school curriculum, the responsibilities of citizenship incumbent on the academic community within higher education has been largely overlooked. This paper examines the reasons for the apparent decline of academic citizenship through an analysis of three elements of citizenship. It argues that the erosion of academic self-governance has led to the decline of political literacy in academic life and that a range of other forces, including under-funded massification and research audit, have damaged social and moral responsibility and the responsibilities implied by community involvement. It is concluded that adjustments to reward and recognition structures and professorial leadership are vital if the academic is not to become increasingly disengaged from the service role.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169916
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.081

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, BJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-26T00:48:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-26T00:48:37Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationHigher Education Quarterly, 2005, v. 59 n. 4, p. 296 - 312en_US
dc.identifier.issn0951-5224en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169916-
dc.description.abstractCitizenship education has developed against the backdrop of civic disengagement. However, as attention has focused on the incorporation of citizenship education into the school curriculum, the responsibilities of citizenship incumbent on the academic community within higher education has been largely overlooked. This paper examines the reasons for the apparent decline of academic citizenship through an analysis of three elements of citizenship. It argues that the erosion of academic self-governance has led to the decline of political literacy in academic life and that a range of other forces, including under-funded massification and research audit, have damaged social and moral responsibility and the responsibilities implied by community involvement. It is concluded that adjustments to reward and recognition structures and professorial leadership are vital if the academic is not to become increasingly disengaged from the service role.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/HEQUen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHigher Education Quarterlyen_US
dc.titleThe disengaged academic: The retreat from citizenshipen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMacfarlane, BJ: bmac@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMacfarlane, BJ=rp01422en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1468-2273.2005.00299.xen_US
dc.identifier.volume59en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage296en_US
dc.identifier.epage312en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.citeulike434690-

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