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Article: Population decline assessment, historical baselines, and conservation

TitlePopulation decline assessment, historical baselines, and conservation
Authors
KeywordsCensus
Decline
Demography
Genetics
Habitat
Harvest
History
Isotopes
Population
Range
Issue Date2010
Citation
Conservation Letters, 2010, v. 3 n. 6, p. 371-378 How to Cite?
AbstractScientific and historical knowledge of worldwide animal-population decline is fragmentary at best. However, understanding historical population trends is essential for informing best efforts to preserve species. We reviewed the literature of long-term studies of population declines across a set of animal taxa and found that only 15% of the studies used data older than 100 years, and 58% of the studies lacked continuous data. Based on our review, we describe five general approaches to studying population declines: counting, correlative, evolutionary, geochemical, and historical. The most common method of population assessment was a census/counting approach (75% of studies) followed by a range mapping/correlative approach (17% of studies). Evolutionary, geochemical, and historical approaches are used less often but, in combination with traditional counting and correlative methods, they hold great potential as tools for conservation. The multidisciplinary approaches we identify and advocate here will be useful for understanding and potentially reversing population declines and ultimately stemming the tide of extinctions currently underway. ©2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc..
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169863
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.126
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.554
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBonebrake, TCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChristensen, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBoggs, CLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEhrlich, PRen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-25T04:57:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-25T04:57:09Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationConservation Letters, 2010, v. 3 n. 6, p. 371-378en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1755-263Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169863-
dc.description.abstractScientific and historical knowledge of worldwide animal-population decline is fragmentary at best. However, understanding historical population trends is essential for informing best efforts to preserve species. We reviewed the literature of long-term studies of population declines across a set of animal taxa and found that only 15% of the studies used data older than 100 years, and 58% of the studies lacked continuous data. Based on our review, we describe five general approaches to studying population declines: counting, correlative, evolutionary, geochemical, and historical. The most common method of population assessment was a census/counting approach (75% of studies) followed by a range mapping/correlative approach (17% of studies). Evolutionary, geochemical, and historical approaches are used less often but, in combination with traditional counting and correlative methods, they hold great potential as tools for conservation. The multidisciplinary approaches we identify and advocate here will be useful for understanding and potentially reversing population declines and ultimately stemming the tide of extinctions currently underway. ©2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc..en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofConservation Lettersen_HK
dc.subjectCensusen_HK
dc.subjectDeclineen_HK
dc.subjectDemographyen_HK
dc.subjectGeneticsen_HK
dc.subjectHabitaten_HK
dc.subjectHarvesten_HK
dc.subjectHistoryen_HK
dc.subjectIsotopesen_HK
dc.subjectPopulationen_HK
dc.subjectRangeen_HK
dc.titlePopulation decline assessment, historical baselines, and conservationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailBonebrake, TC: tbone@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityBonebrake, TC=rp01676en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1755-263X.2010.00139.xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79957667893en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79957667893&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume3en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage371en_HK
dc.identifier.epage378en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000284893700001-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBonebrake, TC=12798028100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChristensen, J=7402504145en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBoggs, CL=7005679578en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEhrlich, PR=7101963320en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7802711-

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