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Article: Oviposition behavior and offspring performance in herbivorous insects: Consequences of climatic and habitat heterogeneity

TitleOviposition behavior and offspring performance in herbivorous insects: Consequences of climatic and habitat heterogeneity
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/ECO
Citation
Oikos, 2010, v. 119 n. 6, p. 927-934 How to Cite?
AbstractThe preference-performance hypothesis predicts that when female herbivorous insects determine where to position offspring of low mobility, they will select sites that maximize development and survival of those offspring. How this critical relationship responds to variation in climatic and habitat conditions remains untested, however, despite its important consequences for population and evolutionary dynamics. Here we report on 13 years of data totaling 1348 egg clusters of the montane Gillette's checkerspot butterfly Euphydryas gillettii (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). We used these data to test the hypothesis that, in environments with climatic and habitat heterogeneity, the oviposition behavior-offspring performance relationship should vary in both space and time. Orientation of egg clusters for maximum morning sun exposure is known to affect developmental rate. We therefore predicted female preference for morning sun orientation to be variable and a function of climatic and habitat conditions. We found that preference for egg cluster orientation on the leaf tracked the phenology of the start of the female flight season but that seasonal temperatures drove most of the variation in egg cluster development time. The relationship between behavior and performance was also dependent upon the climatic effects on survival; sun-oriented egg clusters had higher survivorship in the coldest year of the four years for which measurements were made. We also examined how conifer cover affected larval survival and female oviposition behavior in one year. Females selected oviposition sites in more open habitat. However, when egg clusters were oriented to intercept morning sun, conifer cover increased survivorship to diapause. Finally, we found that predator activity was lower for morning sun-oriented egg clusters suggesting that predation patterns may further influence habitat selection for oviposition. This study exemplifies how the relationship between oviposition behavior and offspring performance is context-dependent: habitat and climate interact to determine preference-performance outcomes. © 2009 The Authors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169859
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.586
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.473
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBonebrake, TCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBoggs, CLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcNally, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRanganathan, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEhrlich, PRen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-25T04:57:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-25T04:57:08Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationOikos, 2010, v. 119 n. 6, p. 927-934en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0030-1299en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169859-
dc.description.abstractThe preference-performance hypothesis predicts that when female herbivorous insects determine where to position offspring of low mobility, they will select sites that maximize development and survival of those offspring. How this critical relationship responds to variation in climatic and habitat conditions remains untested, however, despite its important consequences for population and evolutionary dynamics. Here we report on 13 years of data totaling 1348 egg clusters of the montane Gillette's checkerspot butterfly Euphydryas gillettii (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). We used these data to test the hypothesis that, in environments with climatic and habitat heterogeneity, the oviposition behavior-offspring performance relationship should vary in both space and time. Orientation of egg clusters for maximum morning sun exposure is known to affect developmental rate. We therefore predicted female preference for morning sun orientation to be variable and a function of climatic and habitat conditions. We found that preference for egg cluster orientation on the leaf tracked the phenology of the start of the female flight season but that seasonal temperatures drove most of the variation in egg cluster development time. The relationship between behavior and performance was also dependent upon the climatic effects on survival; sun-oriented egg clusters had higher survivorship in the coldest year of the four years for which measurements were made. We also examined how conifer cover affected larval survival and female oviposition behavior in one year. Females selected oviposition sites in more open habitat. However, when egg clusters were oriented to intercept morning sun, conifer cover increased survivorship to diapause. Finally, we found that predator activity was lower for morning sun-oriented egg clusters suggesting that predation patterns may further influence habitat selection for oviposition. This study exemplifies how the relationship between oviposition behavior and offspring performance is context-dependent: habitat and climate interact to determine preference-performance outcomes. © 2009 The Authors.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/ECOen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofOikosen_HK
dc.titleOviposition behavior and offspring performance in herbivorous insects: Consequences of climatic and habitat heterogeneityen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailBonebrake, TC: tbone@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityBonebrake, TC=rp01676en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0706.2009.17759.xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953546689en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953546689&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume119en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage927en_HK
dc.identifier.epage934en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278036500004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBonebrake, TC=12798028100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBoggs, CL=7005679578en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcNally, JM=36458911200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRanganathan, J=10041564600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEhrlich, PR=7101963320en_HK

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