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Article: Chick tooth induction revisited

TitleChick tooth induction revisited
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0022-104X:1/
Citation
Journal Of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular And Developmental Evolution, 2009, v. 312 n. 5, p. 465-472 How to Cite?
Abstract
Teeth have been missing from Aves for almost 100 million years. However, it is believed that the avian oral epithelium retains the molecular signaling required to induce odontogenesis, and this has been widely examined using heterospecific recombinations with mouse dental mesenchyme. It has also been argued that teeth can form from the avian oral epithelium owing to contamination of the mouse mesenchyme with mouse dental epithelial cells. To investigate the possibility of tooth formation from chick oral epithelium and the characteristics of possible chick enamel, we applied LacZ transgenic mice during heterospecific recombination and examined the further tooth formation. Transmission electron microscopy was used to identify the two tissues during development after heterospecific recombination. No mixing was detected between chick oral epithelium and mouse dental mesenchyme after 2 days, and secretory ameloblasts with Tomes' processes were observed after 1 week. Teeth were formed after 3 weeks with a single cusp pattern, possibly determined by epithelial factors, which is similar to that of the avian tooth in the late Jurassic period. These recombinant teeth were smaller than mouse molars, whereas perfect structures of both ameloblasts and enamel showed histological characteristics similar to those of mice. Together these observations consistent with previous report that odontogenesis is initially directed by species-specific mesenchymal signals interplaying with common epithelial signals. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169564
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 1.876
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCai, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorCho, SWen_US
dc.contributor.authorIshiyama, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorMikami, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorHosoya, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorKozawa, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorOhshima, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorJung, HSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-25T04:52:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-25T04:52:55Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular And Developmental Evolution, 2009, v. 312 n. 5, p. 465-472en_US
dc.identifier.issn1552-5007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169564-
dc.description.abstractTeeth have been missing from Aves for almost 100 million years. However, it is believed that the avian oral epithelium retains the molecular signaling required to induce odontogenesis, and this has been widely examined using heterospecific recombinations with mouse dental mesenchyme. It has also been argued that teeth can form from the avian oral epithelium owing to contamination of the mouse mesenchyme with mouse dental epithelial cells. To investigate the possibility of tooth formation from chick oral epithelium and the characteristics of possible chick enamel, we applied LacZ transgenic mice during heterospecific recombination and examined the further tooth formation. Transmission electron microscopy was used to identify the two tissues during development after heterospecific recombination. No mixing was detected between chick oral epithelium and mouse dental mesenchyme after 2 days, and secretory ameloblasts with Tomes' processes were observed after 1 week. Teeth were formed after 3 weeks with a single cusp pattern, possibly determined by epithelial factors, which is similar to that of the avian tooth in the late Jurassic period. These recombinant teeth were smaller than mouse molars, whereas perfect structures of both ameloblasts and enamel showed histological characteristics similar to those of mice. Together these observations consistent with previous report that odontogenesis is initially directed by species-specific mesenchymal signals interplaying with common epithelial signals. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0022-104X:1/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolutionen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshChick Embryo - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChickensen_US
dc.subject.meshDna Primersen_US
dc.subject.meshEpithelial Cells - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMiceen_US
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred Icren_US
dc.subject.meshMice, Transgenicen_US
dc.subject.meshMolar - Embryologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMouth - Embryologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMouth Mucosa - Cytology - Embryology - Physiology - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.subject.meshOdontogenesis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshRecombination, Geneticen_US
dc.subject.meshReverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reactionen_US
dc.subject.meshBeta-Galactosidase - Geneticsen_US
dc.titleChick tooth induction revisiteden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailJung, HS: hsjung@yuhs.acen_US
dc.identifier.authorityJung, HS=rp01683en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jez.b.21265en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19226602en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67651235827en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67651235827&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume312en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage465en_US
dc.identifier.epage472en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000267347300009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCai, J=9246458800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCho, SW=32967447200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIshiyama, M=7006180239en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMikami, M=7101920637en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHosoya, A=8651007100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKozawa, Y=7006497112en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOhshima, H=7202879991en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJung, HS=7403030195en_US

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