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Article: Pulpal regeneration following allogenic tooth transplantation into mouse maxilla

TitlePulpal regeneration following allogenic tooth transplantation into mouse maxilla
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/113463905
Citation
Anatomical Record, 2009, v. 292 n. 4, p. 570-579 How to Cite?
AbstractAutogenic tooth transplantation is now a common procedure in dentistry for replacing a missing tooth. However, there are many difficulties in clinical application of allogenic tooth transplantation because of immunological rejection. This study aims to clarify pulpal regeneration following allogenic tooth transplantation into the mouse maxilla by immunohistochemistry for 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and nestin, and by the histochemistry for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). The upper right first molar (M1) of 2-week-old mice was extracted and allografted in the original socket in both the littermate and non-littermate after the extraction of M1. Tooth transplantation weakened the nestin-positive reactions in the pulp tissue that had shown immunoreactivity for nestin before operation. On postoperative Days 5-7, tertiary dentin formation commenced next to the preexisting dentin where nestin-positive odontoblast-like cells were arranged in all cases of the littermate group until Day 14, except for one case showing immunological rejection in the pulp chamber. In the non-littermate group, bone-like tissue formation occurred in the pulp chamber in addition to tertiary dentin formation until Day 14. The rate of tertiary dentin was 38%, and the rate of the mixed form of dentin and bone-like tissue formation was 23% (the remainder was immunological rejection). Interestingly, the periodontal tissue recovered even in the case of immunological rejection in which the pulp chamber was replaced by sparse connective tissue. These results suggest that the selection of littermate or non-littermate is decisive for the survival of odontoblast-lineage cells and that the immunological rejection does not influence the periodontal regeneration. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169559
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.507
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.778
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorUnno, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorSuzuki, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorNakakuraOhshima, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorJung, HSen_US
dc.contributor.authorOhshima, Hen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-25T04:52:52Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-25T04:52:52Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationAnatomical Record, 2009, v. 292 n. 4, p. 570-579en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-8486en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169559-
dc.description.abstractAutogenic tooth transplantation is now a common procedure in dentistry for replacing a missing tooth. However, there are many difficulties in clinical application of allogenic tooth transplantation because of immunological rejection. This study aims to clarify pulpal regeneration following allogenic tooth transplantation into the mouse maxilla by immunohistochemistry for 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and nestin, and by the histochemistry for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). The upper right first molar (M1) of 2-week-old mice was extracted and allografted in the original socket in both the littermate and non-littermate after the extraction of M1. Tooth transplantation weakened the nestin-positive reactions in the pulp tissue that had shown immunoreactivity for nestin before operation. On postoperative Days 5-7, tertiary dentin formation commenced next to the preexisting dentin where nestin-positive odontoblast-like cells were arranged in all cases of the littermate group until Day 14, except for one case showing immunological rejection in the pulp chamber. In the non-littermate group, bone-like tissue formation occurred in the pulp chamber in addition to tertiary dentin formation until Day 14. The rate of tertiary dentin was 38%, and the rate of the mixed form of dentin and bone-like tissue formation was 23% (the remainder was immunological rejection). Interestingly, the periodontal tissue recovered even in the case of immunological rejection in which the pulp chamber was replaced by sparse connective tissue. These results suggest that the selection of littermate or non-littermate is decisive for the survival of odontoblast-lineage cells and that the immunological rejection does not influence the periodontal regeneration. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/113463905en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAnatomical Recorden_US
dc.subject.meshAcid Phosphatase - Analysis - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBiological Markersen_US
dc.subject.meshBone Regeneration - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBromodeoxyuridineen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Lineage - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Proliferationen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Pulp Cavity - Cytology - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDentin - Cytology - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshGraft Rejection - Genetics - Immunologyen_US
dc.subject.meshGraft Survival - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshImmunohistochemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshIntermediate Filament Proteins - Analysis - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshIsoenzymes - Analysis - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshMaxilla - Cytology - Physiology - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshMiceen_US
dc.subject.meshNerve Tissue Proteins - Analysis - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshOdontoblasts - Cytology - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshSiblingsen_US
dc.subject.meshTooth - Cytology - Physiology - Transplantationen_US
dc.subject.meshTransplantation, Homologous - Methodsen_US
dc.titlePulpal regeneration following allogenic tooth transplantation into mouse maxillaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailJung, HS: hsjung@yuhs.acen_US
dc.identifier.authorityJung, HS=rp01683en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ar.20831en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19226618en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-65549171221en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-65549171221&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume292en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage570en_US
dc.identifier.epage579en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000264998900013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridUnno, H=35068785300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSuzuki, H=8740460700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNakakuraOhshima, K=6602464566en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJung, HS=7403030195en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOhshima, H=7202879991en_US

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