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Article: Medication-induced acute angle closure attack

TitleMedication-induced acute angle closure attack
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org.hk
Citation
Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2012, v. 18 n. 2, p. 139-145 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: To review acute angle closure attacks induced by local and systemic medications. DATA SOURCES: PubMed literature searches up to August 2011. STUDY SELECTION: The following key words were used for the search: 'drug', 'iatrogenic', 'acute angle closure glaucoma'. DATA EXTRACTION: A total of 86 articles were retrieved using the key words. Only those concerning acute angle closure attack triggered by local or systemic drug administration were included. For articles on the same or related topics, those published at later or more recent dates were selected. As a result, 44 articles were included and formed the basis of this review. DATA SYNTHESIS: An acute attack of angle closure can be triggered by dilatation of the pupil, by anatomical changes in the ciliary body and iris, or by movement of the iris-lens diaphragm. Local and systemic medications that cause these changes have the potential to precipitate an attack of acute angle closure. The risk is higher in subjects who are predisposed to the development of angle closure. Many pharmaceutical agents including ophthalmic eyedrops and systemic drugs prescribed by general practitioners and various specialists (in psychiatry, otorhinolaryngology, ophthalmology, medicine, and anaesthesia) can precipitate an acute angle closure attack. The medications include: anti-histamines, anti-epileptics, antiparkinsonian agents, antispasmolytic drugs, mydriatic agents, sympathetic agents, and botulinum toxin. CONCLUSION: Since acute angle closure attack is a potentially blinding eye disease, it is extremely important to be vigilant and aware of ophthalmic and systemic medications that can lead to such attacks in predisposed subjects and to diagnose the condition when it occurs.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169512
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 0.872
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.237
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, JSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorGangwani, RAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-18T09:00:35Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-18T09:00:35Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Medical Journal, 2012, v. 18 n. 2, p. 139-145en_US
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169512-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To review acute angle closure attacks induced by local and systemic medications. DATA SOURCES: PubMed literature searches up to August 2011. STUDY SELECTION: The following key words were used for the search: 'drug', 'iatrogenic', 'acute angle closure glaucoma'. DATA EXTRACTION: A total of 86 articles were retrieved using the key words. Only those concerning acute angle closure attack triggered by local or systemic drug administration were included. For articles on the same or related topics, those published at later or more recent dates were selected. As a result, 44 articles were included and formed the basis of this review. DATA SYNTHESIS: An acute attack of angle closure can be triggered by dilatation of the pupil, by anatomical changes in the ciliary body and iris, or by movement of the iris-lens diaphragm. Local and systemic medications that cause these changes have the potential to precipitate an attack of acute angle closure. The risk is higher in subjects who are predisposed to the development of angle closure. Many pharmaceutical agents including ophthalmic eyedrops and systemic drugs prescribed by general practitioners and various specialists (in psychiatry, otorhinolaryngology, ophthalmology, medicine, and anaesthesia) can precipitate an acute angle closure attack. The medications include: anti-histamines, anti-epileptics, antiparkinsonian agents, antispasmolytic drugs, mydriatic agents, sympathetic agents, and botulinum toxin. CONCLUSION: Since acute angle closure attack is a potentially blinding eye disease, it is extremely important to be vigilant and aware of ophthalmic and systemic medications that can lead to such attacks in predisposed subjects and to diagnose the condition when it occurs.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org.hk-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journalen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshAcute Disease-
dc.subject.meshAnticonvulsants - Adverse Effects-
dc.subject.meshAntidepressive Agents - Adverse Effects-
dc.subject.meshCholinergic Antagonists - Adverse Effects-
dc.subject.meshGlaucoma, Angle-Closure - Chemically Induced-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMydriatics - Adverse Effects-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.titleMedication-induced acute angle closure attacken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, JSM: laism@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailGangwani, RA: gangwani@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLai, JSM=rp00295en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.pmid22477738-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84861170965-
dc.identifier.hkuros212131en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84861170965&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpage-
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage139en_US
dc.identifier.epage145en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302592600010-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, JSM=7401939748-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGangwani, RA=36702459300-

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