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Article: Extreme conservation and non-neutral evolution of the cpmA Circadian locus in a globally distributed Chroococcidiopsis sp. from naturally stressful habitats

TitleExtreme conservation and non-neutral evolution of the cpmA Circadian locus in a globally distributed Chroococcidiopsis sp. from naturally stressful habitats
Authors
KeywordsAnimal experiment
Bacterial strain
Bacterium culture
Chroococcidiopsis
Circadian rhythm
Issue Date2012
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Molecular Biology and Evolution, 2012, v. 29 n. 12, p. 3899-3907 How to Cite?
AbstractCyanobacteria are among the most ancient organisms known to have circadian rhythms. The cpmA gene is involved in controlling the circadian output signal. We studied polymorphism and divergence of this gene in six populations of a stress-tolerant cyanobacterium, Chroococcidiopsis sp., sampled in extreme habitats across the globe. Despite high haplotype diversity (0.774), nucleotide diversity of cpmA is very low (pi = 0.0034): the gene appears to be even more conserved than housekeeping genes. Even though the populations were sampled thousands kilometers apart, they manifested virtually no genetic differentiation at this locus (F(ST) = 0.0228). Using various tests for neutrality, we determined that evolution of cpmA significantly departures from the neutral model and is governed by episodic positive selection.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169428
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 13.649
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 8.168
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDvornyk, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorJahan, ASen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-18T08:54:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-18T08:54:44Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationMolecular Biology and Evolution, 2012, v. 29 n. 12, p. 3899-3907en_US
dc.identifier.issn0737-4038-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169428-
dc.description.abstractCyanobacteria are among the most ancient organisms known to have circadian rhythms. The cpmA gene is involved in controlling the circadian output signal. We studied polymorphism and divergence of this gene in six populations of a stress-tolerant cyanobacterium, Chroococcidiopsis sp., sampled in extreme habitats across the globe. Despite high haplotype diversity (0.774), nucleotide diversity of cpmA is very low (pi = 0.0034): the gene appears to be even more conserved than housekeeping genes. Even though the populations were sampled thousands kilometers apart, they manifested virtually no genetic differentiation at this locus (F(ST) = 0.0228). Using various tests for neutrality, we determined that evolution of cpmA significantly departures from the neutral model and is governed by episodic positive selection.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofMolecular Biology and Evolutionen_US
dc.subjectAnimal experiment-
dc.subjectBacterial strain-
dc.subjectBacterium culture-
dc.subjectChroococcidiopsis-
dc.subjectCircadian rhythm-
dc.titleExtreme conservation and non-neutral evolution of the cpmA Circadian locus in a globally distributed Chroococcidiopsis sp. from naturally stressful habitatsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailDvornyk, V: dvornyk@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityDvornyk, V=rp00693en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/molbev/mss191-
dc.identifier.pmid22844070-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84869014713-
dc.identifier.hkuros211989en_US
dc.identifier.volume29-
dc.identifier.issue12-
dc.identifier.spage3899-
dc.identifier.epage3907-
dc.identifier.eissn1537-1719-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000310970000024-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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