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Article: Outreach social workers for at-risk youth: a test of their attitudes towards crime and young offenders in Hong Kong

TitleOutreach social workers for at-risk youth: a test of their attitudes towards crime and young offenders in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsAt-risk youth
Attitudes
Hong kong chinese
Outreach social workers
Young offenders
Issue Date2012
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/childyouth
Citation
Children and Youth Services Review, 2012, v. 34 n. 12, p. 2273-2279 How to Cite?
AbstractIn Hong Kong, outreach social workers, a distinct group of social workers, are encouraged to initiate and maintain contact with young people who are perceived as 'at-risk' of undesirable influences. In this study, 80 outreach social workers (45 females and 35 males) are recruited to explore their attitudes towards crime and young offenders in Hong Kong. Four measures (Attitudes towards the Causes of Crime Scale, Attitudes towards the Prevention of Crime Scale, Attitudes towards the Treatment of Crime Scale, and Attitudes towards Prisoner scale were self-administered by the participants. Overall, male and female participants are relatively similar in their perception in these four measures, with an exception that female participants are more likely than their male counterparts to perceive crimes as caused by nature (heredity and individual) factors. An ordinary least square regression indicates that the increase in years working as social workers is equally likely to reduce their probability to perceive crimes as caused by nature and nurture (social and environmental) factors. More research is required to explore further for such trend. As expected, the increase in years working as outreach social workers is likely to increase their likelihood to support for social intervention preventive measures. Finally, age is a salient attitudinal predictor of offender treatment approach, with older participants likely to hold more punitive attitudes towards offenders. Limitations and implications for future research are also discussed. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169267
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.969
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.718
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChui, WHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, HCOen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-18T08:47:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-18T08:47:59Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationChildren and Youth Services Review, 2012, v. 34 n. 12, p. 2273-2279en_US
dc.identifier.issn0190-7409-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169267-
dc.description.abstractIn Hong Kong, outreach social workers, a distinct group of social workers, are encouraged to initiate and maintain contact with young people who are perceived as 'at-risk' of undesirable influences. In this study, 80 outreach social workers (45 females and 35 males) are recruited to explore their attitudes towards crime and young offenders in Hong Kong. Four measures (Attitudes towards the Causes of Crime Scale, Attitudes towards the Prevention of Crime Scale, Attitudes towards the Treatment of Crime Scale, and Attitudes towards Prisoner scale were self-administered by the participants. Overall, male and female participants are relatively similar in their perception in these four measures, with an exception that female participants are more likely than their male counterparts to perceive crimes as caused by nature (heredity and individual) factors. An ordinary least square regression indicates that the increase in years working as social workers is equally likely to reduce their probability to perceive crimes as caused by nature and nurture (social and environmental) factors. More research is required to explore further for such trend. As expected, the increase in years working as outreach social workers is likely to increase their likelihood to support for social intervention preventive measures. Finally, age is a salient attitudinal predictor of offender treatment approach, with older participants likely to hold more punitive attitudes towards offenders. Limitations and implications for future research are also discussed. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/childyouthen_US
dc.relation.ispartofChildren and Youth Services Reviewen_US
dc.subjectAt-risk youth-
dc.subjectAttitudes-
dc.subjectHong kong chinese-
dc.subjectOutreach social workers-
dc.subjectYoung offenders-
dc.titleOutreach social workers for at-risk youth: a test of their attitudes towards crime and young offenders in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChui, WH: ericchui@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChui, WH=rp00854en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.childyouth.2012.08.006-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84868305309-
dc.identifier.hkuros211796en_US
dc.identifier.volume34en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.spage2273en_US
dc.identifier.epage2279en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000311471400003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.citeulike11801608-

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