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Article: Engineered human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac cells and tissues for electrophysiological studies

TitleEngineered human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac cells and tissues for electrophysiological studies
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherElsevier Ltd, Trends Journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ddmod
Citation
Drug Discovery Today: Disease Models, 2012, v. 9 n. 4, p. e209-e217 How to Cite?
AbstractHuman cardiomyocytes (CMs) do not proliferate in culture and are difficult to obtain for practical reasons. As such, our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the physiological and pathophysiological development of the human heart is mostly extrapolated from studies of the mouse and other animal models or heterologus expression of defective gene product(s) in non-human cells. Although these studies provided numerous important insights, much of the exact behavior in human cells remains unexplored given that significant species differences exist. With the derivation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients with underlying heart disease, a source of human CMs for disease modeling, cardiotoxicity screening and drug discovery is now available. In this review, we focus our discussion on the use of hESC/iPSC-derived cardiac cells and tissues for studying various heart rhythm disorders and the associated pro-arrhythmogenic properties in relation to advancements in electrophysiology and tissue engineering. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169251
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.286

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLieu, DKen_US
dc.contributor.authorTurnbull, ICen_US
dc.contributor.authorCosta, KDen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, RAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-18T08:47:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-18T08:47:07Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationDrug Discovery Today: Disease Models, 2012, v. 9 n. 4, p. e209-e217en_US
dc.identifier.issn1740-6757-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169251-
dc.description.abstractHuman cardiomyocytes (CMs) do not proliferate in culture and are difficult to obtain for practical reasons. As such, our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the physiological and pathophysiological development of the human heart is mostly extrapolated from studies of the mouse and other animal models or heterologus expression of defective gene product(s) in non-human cells. Although these studies provided numerous important insights, much of the exact behavior in human cells remains unexplored given that significant species differences exist. With the derivation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients with underlying heart disease, a source of human CMs for disease modeling, cardiotoxicity screening and drug discovery is now available. In this review, we focus our discussion on the use of hESC/iPSC-derived cardiac cells and tissues for studying various heart rhythm disorders and the associated pro-arrhythmogenic properties in relation to advancements in electrophysiology and tissue engineering. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd, Trends Journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ddmod-
dc.relation.ispartofDrug Discovery Today: Disease Modelsen_US
dc.titleEngineered human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac cells and tissues for electrophysiological studiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLieu, DK: deborah.lieu@mssm.eduen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, RA: ronaldli@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLi, RA=rp01352en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ddmod.2012.06.002-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84876670794-
dc.identifier.hkuros212195en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros212196-
dc.identifier.hkuros222582-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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