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Article: Do girls and boys perceive themselves as equally engaged in school? The results of an international study from 12 countries
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TitleDo girls and boys perceive themselves as equally engaged in school? The results of an international study from 12 countries
 
AuthorsLam, SF4
Jimerson, S12
Kikas, E7 14
Cefai, C6
Veiga, FH16
Nelson, B9
Hatzichristou, C1
Polychroni, F1
Basnett, J10
Duck, R8
Farrell, P3
Liu, Y2
Negovan, V15
Shin, H11
Stanculescu, E15
Wong, BPH4
Yang, H5
Zollneritsch, J13
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jschpsyc
 
CitationJournal Of School Psychology, 2012, v. 50 n. 1, p. 77-94 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2011.07.004
 
AbstractThis study examined gender differences in student engagement and academic performance in school. Participants included 3420 students (7th, 8th, and 9th graders) from Austria, Canada, China, Cyprus, Estonia, Greece, Malta, Portugal, Romania, South Korea, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The results indicated that, compared to boys, girls reported higher levels of engagement in school and were rated higher by their teachers in academic performance. Student engagement accounted for gender differences in academic performance, but gender did not moderate the associations among student engagement, academic performance, or contextual supports. Analysis of multiple-group structural equation modeling revealed that perceptions of teacher support and parent support, but not peer support, were related indirectly to academic performance through student engagement. This partial mediation model was invariant across gender. The findings from this study enhance the understanding about the contextual and personal factors associated with girls' and boys' academic performance around the world. © 2011 Society for the Study of School Psychology.
 
ISSN0022-4405
2013 Impact Factor: 2.282
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.799
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2011.07.004
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLam, SF
 
dc.contributor.authorJimerson, S
 
dc.contributor.authorKikas, E
 
dc.contributor.authorCefai, C
 
dc.contributor.authorVeiga, FH
 
dc.contributor.authorNelson, B
 
dc.contributor.authorHatzichristou, C
 
dc.contributor.authorPolychroni, F
 
dc.contributor.authorBasnett, J
 
dc.contributor.authorDuck, R
 
dc.contributor.authorFarrell, P
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorNegovan, V
 
dc.contributor.authorShin, H
 
dc.contributor.authorStanculescu, E
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, BPH
 
dc.contributor.authorYang, H
 
dc.contributor.authorZollneritsch, J
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:41:47Z
 
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:41:47Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractThis study examined gender differences in student engagement and academic performance in school. Participants included 3420 students (7th, 8th, and 9th graders) from Austria, Canada, China, Cyprus, Estonia, Greece, Malta, Portugal, Romania, South Korea, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The results indicated that, compared to boys, girls reported higher levels of engagement in school and were rated higher by their teachers in academic performance. Student engagement accounted for gender differences in academic performance, but gender did not moderate the associations among student engagement, academic performance, or contextual supports. Analysis of multiple-group structural equation modeling revealed that perceptions of teacher support and parent support, but not peer support, were related indirectly to academic performance through student engagement. This partial mediation model was invariant across gender. The findings from this study enhance the understanding about the contextual and personal factors associated with girls' and boys' academic performance around the world. © 2011 Society for the Study of School Psychology.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of School Psychology, 2012, v. 50 n. 1, p. 77-94 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2011.07.004
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10433524
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2011.07.004
 
dc.identifier.epage94
 
dc.identifier.hkuros207925
 
dc.identifier.issn0022-4405
2013 Impact Factor: 2.282
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.799
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.pmid22386079
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84857690422
 
dc.identifier.spage77
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169100
 
dc.identifier.volume50
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jschpsyc
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of School Psychology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAchievement
 
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
 
dc.subject.meshCanada
 
dc.subject.meshChild
 
dc.subject.meshChina
 
dc.subject.meshCross-Cultural Comparison
 
dc.subject.meshEducational Status
 
dc.subject.meshEurope
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshModels, Psychological
 
dc.subject.meshPeer Group
 
dc.subject.meshPerception
 
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires
 
dc.subject.meshSchools
 
dc.subject.meshSex Factors
 
dc.subject.meshSocial Environment
 
dc.subject.meshStudents - Psychology
 
dc.subject.meshUnited States
 
dc.titleDo girls and boys perceive themselves as equally engaged in school? The results of an international study from 12 countries
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. University of Athens
  2. Yunnan Health Education Institute
  3. University of Manchester
  4. The University of Hong Kong
  5. Zhejiang University
  6. University of Malta
  7. University of Tartu
  8. Université Laurentienne
  9. The California State University
  10. St Helens Metropolitan Borough Council
  11. Chonnam National University
  12. University of California, Santa Barbara
  13. Styria Local Ministry of Education
  14. Tallinn University
  15. Universitatea din Bucuresti
  16. Universidade de Lisboa