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Article: Age-related differences in attentional networks of alerting and executive control in young, middle-aged, and older Chinese adults
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TitleAge-related differences in attentional networks of alerting and executive control in young, middle-aged, and older Chinese adults
 
AuthorsZhou, SS2
Fan, J3
Lee, TMC1
Wang, CQ2
Wang, K2
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/b&c
 
CitationBrain And Cognition, 2011, v. 75 n. 2, p. 205-210 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandc.2010.12.003
 
AbstractPrevious studies suggest that aging is associated with impairment of attention. However, it is not known whether this represents a global attentional deficit or relates to a specific attentional network. We used the attention network test to examine three groups of younger, middle-aged, and older participants with respect to the efficiency of three anatomically defined attentional networks: alerting network, orienting network, and executive control network. Age-related change was found to have the greatest effect on the executive network and the least effect on the alerting network as well as on overall mean response time. Impairment of the orienting network was found to be insignificant. Age-related deterioration of the prefrontal lobe, the dopaminergic system, and function of specific genes may explain the age-related changes in executive attention, which occur after the fourth decade of life. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.
 
ISSN0278-2626
2012 Impact Factor: 2.823
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.407
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandc.2010.12.003
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorZhou, SS
 
dc.contributor.authorFan, J
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMC
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, CQ
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, K
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:41:35Z
 
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:41:35Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies suggest that aging is associated with impairment of attention. However, it is not known whether this represents a global attentional deficit or relates to a specific attentional network. We used the attention network test to examine three groups of younger, middle-aged, and older participants with respect to the efficiency of three anatomically defined attentional networks: alerting network, orienting network, and executive control network. Age-related change was found to have the greatest effect on the executive network and the least effect on the alerting network as well as on overall mean response time. Impairment of the orienting network was found to be insignificant. Age-related deterioration of the prefrontal lobe, the dopaminergic system, and function of specific genes may explain the age-related changes in executive attention, which occur after the fourth decade of life. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationBrain And Cognition, 2011, v. 75 n. 2, p. 205-210 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandc.2010.12.003
 
dc.identifier.citeulike8712986
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandc.2010.12.003
 
dc.identifier.epage210
 
dc.identifier.hkuros218991
 
dc.identifier.issn0278-2626
2012 Impact Factor: 2.823
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.407
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.pmid21251744
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79151472170
 
dc.identifier.spage205
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169083
 
dc.identifier.volume75
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/b&c
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofBrain and Cognition
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAge Factors
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Over
 
dc.subject.meshAging - Physiology
 
dc.subject.meshAnalysis Of Variance
 
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group
 
dc.subject.meshAttention - Physiology
 
dc.subject.meshCues
 
dc.subject.meshExecutive Function - Physiology
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshNeuropsychological Tests
 
dc.subject.meshOrientation - Physiology
 
dc.subject.meshPhotic Stimulation
 
dc.subject.meshReaction Time - Physiology
 
dc.titleAge-related differences in attentional networks of alerting and executive control in young, middle-aged, and older Chinese adults
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Anhui Medical University
  3. Mount Sinai School of Medicine