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Article: Subjective discriminability of invisibility: A framework for distinguishing perceptual and attentional failures of awareness

TitleSubjective discriminability of invisibility: A framework for distinguishing perceptual and attentional failures of awareness
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/concog
Citation
Consciousness And Cognition, 2010, v. 19 n. 4, p. 1045-1057 How to Cite?
AbstractConscious visual perception can fail in many circumstances. However, little is known about the causes and processes leading to failures of visual awareness. In this study, we introduce a new signal detection measure termed subjective discriminability of invisibility (SDI) that allows one to distinguish between subjective blindness due to reduction of sensory signals or to lack of attentional access to sensory signals. The SDI is computed based upon subjective confidence in reporting the absence of a target (i.e., miss and correct rejection trials). Using this new measure, we found that target misses were subjectively indistinguishable from physical absence when contrast reduction, backward masking and flash suppression were used, whereas confidence was appropriately modulated when dual task, attentional blink and spatial uncertainty methods were employed. These results show that failure of visual perception can be identified as either a result of perceptual or attentional blindness depending on the circumstances under which visual awareness was impaired. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169082
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.182
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.363
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKanai, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorTseng, CHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:41:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:41:33Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationConsciousness And Cognition, 2010, v. 19 n. 4, p. 1045-1057en_US
dc.identifier.issn1053-8100en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169082-
dc.description.abstractConscious visual perception can fail in many circumstances. However, little is known about the causes and processes leading to failures of visual awareness. In this study, we introduce a new signal detection measure termed subjective discriminability of invisibility (SDI) that allows one to distinguish between subjective blindness due to reduction of sensory signals or to lack of attentional access to sensory signals. The SDI is computed based upon subjective confidence in reporting the absence of a target (i.e., miss and correct rejection trials). Using this new measure, we found that target misses were subjectively indistinguishable from physical absence when contrast reduction, backward masking and flash suppression were used, whereas confidence was appropriately modulated when dual task, attentional blink and spatial uncertainty methods were employed. These results show that failure of visual perception can be identified as either a result of perceptual or attentional blindness depending on the circumstances under which visual awareness was impaired. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/concogen_US
dc.relation.ispartofConsciousness and Cognitionen_US
dc.subject.meshAttentional Blinken_US
dc.subject.meshAwarenessen_US
dc.subject.meshContrast Sensitivityen_US
dc.subject.meshDiscrimination (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshOrientationen_US
dc.subject.meshPattern Recognition, Visualen_US
dc.subject.meshPerceptual Maskingen_US
dc.subject.meshPhotic Stimulationen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychophysicsen_US
dc.subject.meshSensory Thresholdsen_US
dc.subject.meshSignal Detection, Psychologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshVisual Perceptionen_US
dc.titleSubjective discriminability of invisibility: A framework for distinguishing perceptual and attentional failures of awarenessen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTseng, CH:tseng@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTseng, CH=rp00640en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.concog.2010.06.003en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20598906-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78149496161en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros175119-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78149496161&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage1045en_US
dc.identifier.epage1057en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1090-2376-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000284519800020-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKanai, R=35570064300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWalsh, V=7005240472en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTseng, CH=7402541752en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike7473504-

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