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Article: Contact and other-race effects in configural and component processing of faces

TitleContact and other-race effects in configural and component processing of faces
Authors
Issue Date2009
Citation
British Journal Of Psychology, 2009, v. 100 n. 4, p. 717-728 How to Cite?
AbstractOther-race faces are generally recognized more poorly than own-race faces. There has been a long-standing interest in the extent to which differences in contact contribute to this other-race effect (ORE). Here, we examined the effect of contact on two distinct aspects of face memory, memory for configuration and for components, both of which are better for own-race than other-race faces. Configural and component memory were measured using recognition memory tests with intact study faces and blurred (isolates memory for configuration) and scrambled (isolates memory for components) test faces, respectively. Our participants were a large group of ethnically Chinese individuals who had resided in Australia for varying lengths of time, from a few weeks to 26 years. We found that time in a Western country significantly (negatively) predicted the size of the ORE for configural, but not component, memory. There was also a trend for earlier age of arrival to predict smaller OREs in configural, but not component, memory. These results suggest that memory for configural information in other-race faces improves with experience with such faces. However, as found for recognition memory generally, the contact effects were small, indicating that other factors must play a substantial role in cross-race differences in face memory. © The British Psychological Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169075
ISSN
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRhodes, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorEwing, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorHayward, WGen_US
dc.contributor.authorMaurer, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorMondloch, CJen_US
dc.contributor.authorTanaka, JWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:41:29Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:41:29Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Psychology, 2009, v. 100 n. 4, p. 717-728en_US
dc.identifier.issn2044-8295en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169075-
dc.description.abstractOther-race faces are generally recognized more poorly than own-race faces. There has been a long-standing interest in the extent to which differences in contact contribute to this other-race effect (ORE). Here, we examined the effect of contact on two distinct aspects of face memory, memory for configuration and for components, both of which are better for own-race than other-race faces. Configural and component memory were measured using recognition memory tests with intact study faces and blurred (isolates memory for configuration) and scrambled (isolates memory for components) test faces, respectively. Our participants were a large group of ethnically Chinese individuals who had resided in Australia for varying lengths of time, from a few weeks to 26 years. We found that time in a Western country significantly (negatively) predicted the size of the ORE for configural, but not component, memory. There was also a trend for earlier age of arrival to predict smaller OREs in configural, but not component, memory. These results suggest that memory for configural information in other-race faces improves with experience with such faces. However, as found for recognition memory generally, the contact effects were small, indicating that other factors must play a substantial role in cross-race differences in face memory. © The British Psychological Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Psychologyen_US
dc.titleContact and other-race effects in configural and component processing of facesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHayward, WG:whayward@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHayward, WG=rp00630en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1348/000712608X396503en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19228441-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-73349108502en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros171162-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-73349108502&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume100en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage717en_US
dc.identifier.epage728en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000271031700006-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRhodes, G=7101795943en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEwing, L=16028304500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHayward, WG=7006352956en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMaurer, D=35587217700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMondloch, CJ=6603894289en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTanaka, JW=7401495465en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike5771376-

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