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Article: Masked smoking-related images modulate brain activity in smokers

TitleMasked smoking-related images modulate brain activity in smokers
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/38751
Citation
Human Brain Mapping, 2009, v. 30 n. 3, p. 896-907 How to Cite?
AbstractThe questions of whether and how indiscriminate drug-related stimuli could influence drug- users are important to our understanding of addictive behavior, but the answers are still inconclusive. In the present preliminary functional magnetic resonance imaging study using a backward masking paradigm, the effect of indiscriminate smoking-related stimuli on 10 smokers and 10 nonsmokers was examined. The BOLD response showed a significant reduction (P = 0.001) in the right amygdala of smokers when they viewed but did not perceive masked smoking-related stimuli, while no significant differences were found in the nonsmoker group. More voxels in anterior cingulate cortex were negatively correlated with the amygdala during the masked smoking-related picture condition in smokers but not in nonsmokers, whereas more positively correlated voxels were observed during the masked neutral condition. The BOLD response in drug-users indicates the amygdala responds to drug-related stimuli that are below the perceptual threshold. The functional connectivity data suggest a functional interaction between the amygdala and the anterior cingulate cortex when drug users view 33ms back- masked drug-related stimuli. This observation suggests that the amygdala plays an important role in the indiscriminate drug-related cue process. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169061
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.962
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.165
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorYu, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorSun, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorNing, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorHe, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorHu, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:41:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:41:20Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationHuman Brain Mapping, 2009, v. 30 n. 3, p. 896-907en_US
dc.identifier.issn1065-9471en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169061-
dc.description.abstractThe questions of whether and how indiscriminate drug-related stimuli could influence drug- users are important to our understanding of addictive behavior, but the answers are still inconclusive. In the present preliminary functional magnetic resonance imaging study using a backward masking paradigm, the effect of indiscriminate smoking-related stimuli on 10 smokers and 10 nonsmokers was examined. The BOLD response showed a significant reduction (P = 0.001) in the right amygdala of smokers when they viewed but did not perceive masked smoking-related stimuli, while no significant differences were found in the nonsmoker group. More voxels in anterior cingulate cortex were negatively correlated with the amygdala during the masked smoking-related picture condition in smokers but not in nonsmokers, whereas more positively correlated voxels were observed during the masked neutral condition. The BOLD response in drug-users indicates the amygdala responds to drug-related stimuli that are below the perceptual threshold. The functional connectivity data suggest a functional interaction between the amygdala and the anterior cingulate cortex when drug users view 33ms back- masked drug-related stimuli. This observation suggests that the amygdala plays an important role in the indiscriminate drug-related cue process. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/38751en_US
dc.relation.ispartofHuman Brain Mappingen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBehavior, Addictive - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Mappingen_US
dc.subject.meshCuesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImage Processing, Computer-Assisteden_US
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshNeural Pathways - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSmoking - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTobacco Use Disorder - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.titleMasked smoking-related images modulate brain activity in smokersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSun, D:sundelin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySun, D=rp00873en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hbm.20552en_US
dc.identifier.pmid18344177-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-61449177904en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-61449177904&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume30en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage896en_US
dc.identifier.epage907en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000264015900017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, X=8570352000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, X=8570352100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, Y=7406250414en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, D=25029722800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNing, M=36864617000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHe, S=7402691306en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, X=34770364200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, D=7405356250en_US

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