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Article: Hyperresponsivity to threat stimuli in domestic violence offenders: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

TitleHyperresponsivity to threat stimuli in domestic violence offenders: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherPhysicians Postgraduate Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychiatrist.com
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Psychiatry, 2009, v. 70 n. 1, p. 36-45 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: While spouse abuse research has almost exclusively adopted a social perspective, an increasing body of imaging research is documenting neural contributions to violence. Method: To test the hypothesis that wife batterers are hyperresponsive to threatening stimuli, echo-planar functional magnetic resonance imaging was employed to assess brain function of 10 male batterers and 13 male matched controls during viewing of 4 types of visual stimuli: neutral, positive affect, aggressive-threat, and aggression against women. The study was conducted from September 2005 to August 2006. Results: Compared to controls, batterers showed significantly higher neural hyperresponsivity to the threat stimuli in the hippocampus, fusiform gyrus, posterior cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and occipital cortex (p < .001). To a lesser extent, they also showed increased activation to the aggression against women stimuli, particularly in the precuneus bilaterally (p < .001), and also increased activation to positive affect stimuli in right hemisphere orbitofrontal, anterior cingulate, and inferior parietal cortical regions (p < .001). Conclusions: Findings indicate an affect-processing abnormality in wife batterers and suggest that hypersensitivity to mildly threatening affective provocations by their spouses may represent a neurobiological predisposition to spouse abuse in some men. © Copyright 2009 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169060
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.408
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.042
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, SCen_US
dc.contributor.authorRaine, Aen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:41:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:41:19Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Psychiatry, 2009, v. 70 n. 1, p. 36-45en_US
dc.identifier.issn0160-6689en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169060-
dc.description.abstractObjective: While spouse abuse research has almost exclusively adopted a social perspective, an increasing body of imaging research is documenting neural contributions to violence. Method: To test the hypothesis that wife batterers are hyperresponsive to threatening stimuli, echo-planar functional magnetic resonance imaging was employed to assess brain function of 10 male batterers and 13 male matched controls during viewing of 4 types of visual stimuli: neutral, positive affect, aggressive-threat, and aggression against women. The study was conducted from September 2005 to August 2006. Results: Compared to controls, batterers showed significantly higher neural hyperresponsivity to the threat stimuli in the hippocampus, fusiform gyrus, posterior cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and occipital cortex (p < .001). To a lesser extent, they also showed increased activation to the aggression against women stimuli, particularly in the precuneus bilaterally (p < .001), and also increased activation to positive affect stimuli in right hemisphere orbitofrontal, anterior cingulate, and inferior parietal cortical regions (p < .001). Conclusions: Findings indicate an affect-processing abnormality in wife batterers and suggest that hypersensitivity to mildly threatening affective provocations by their spouses may represent a neurobiological predisposition to spouse abuse in some men. © Copyright 2009 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPhysicians Postgraduate Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychiatrist.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Psychiatryen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAffect - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAggression - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshArousal - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAttention - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Mappingen_US
dc.subject.meshCerebral Cortex - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDominance, Cerebral - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshGyrus Cinguli - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHippocampus - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshNerve Net - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPattern Recognition, Visual - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSpouse Abuse - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshViolence - Psychologyen_US
dc.titleHyperresponsivity to threat stimuli in domestic violence offenders: A functional magnetic resonance imaging studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC:tmclee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TMC=rp00564en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.4088/JCP.08m04143en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19192464-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-60349101767en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros158091-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-60349101767&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume70en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage36en_US
dc.identifier.epage45en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, TMC=7501437381en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, SC=24781803800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRaine, A=7102893592en_US

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