File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Mental imagery for relearning of people after brain injury

TitleMental imagery for relearning of people after brain injury
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02699052.asp
Citation
Brain Injury, 2004, v. 18 n. 11, p. 1163-1172 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: This paper reported on the application of mental imagery to the relearning of daily task performance in people with brain injury. Method: The changes in two subjects who had suffered from cerebral infarction shown throughout a 3-week mental imagery programme were described. The subjects' improvement in task performance and other clinical outcomes illustrated the programme's therapeutic effects on skill relearning, maintenance and generalization. Results: After completing the programme, the subjects showed improvements in performance at both the trained and untrained tasks. Feedback from the patients also suggested its ability to enhance their day-to-day functioning. Clinical assessment results indicated that the subjects experienced an increase in the attention and sequential processing functions but not in the motor and other cognitive functions. Conclusion: Mental imagery appears to be effective at enhancing the task relearning of subjects after brain injury. The skills acquired under this treatment regime can be retained and then generalized to other tasks. Its therapeutic effect is probably mediated by the improved attention and planning and execution functions associated with the rehearsal. Further research should conduct clinical controlled trials to gather evidence on its efficacy at promoting functional regain in people suffering from neurological disorders. © 2004 Taylor & Francis Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169055
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.822
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.781
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, KPYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, CCHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMCen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuiChan, CWYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:41:14Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:41:14Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationBrain Injury, 2004, v. 18 n. 11, p. 1163-1172en_US
dc.identifier.issn0269-9052en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169055-
dc.description.abstractObjective: This paper reported on the application of mental imagery to the relearning of daily task performance in people with brain injury. Method: The changes in two subjects who had suffered from cerebral infarction shown throughout a 3-week mental imagery programme were described. The subjects' improvement in task performance and other clinical outcomes illustrated the programme's therapeutic effects on skill relearning, maintenance and generalization. Results: After completing the programme, the subjects showed improvements in performance at both the trained and untrained tasks. Feedback from the patients also suggested its ability to enhance their day-to-day functioning. Clinical assessment results indicated that the subjects experienced an increase in the attention and sequential processing functions but not in the motor and other cognitive functions. Conclusion: Mental imagery appears to be effective at enhancing the task relearning of subjects after brain injury. The skills acquired under this treatment regime can be retained and then generalized to other tasks. Its therapeutic effect is probably mediated by the improved attention and planning and execution functions associated with the rehearsal. Further research should conduct clinical controlled trials to gather evidence on its efficacy at promoting functional regain in people suffering from neurological disorders. © 2004 Taylor & Francis Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02699052.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBrain Injuryen_US
dc.rightsBrain Injury. Copyright © Informa Healthcare.-
dc.subject.meshActivities Of Daily Livingen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAttentionen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Injuries - Complications - Psychology - Rehabilitationen_US
dc.subject.meshCerebral Infarction - Etiology - Psychology - Rehabilitationen_US
dc.subject.meshCognitionen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImagery (Psychotherapy) - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshLearningen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychomotor Performanceen_US
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_US
dc.titleMental imagery for relearning of people after brain injuryen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC:tmclee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TMC=rp00564en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02699050410001671883en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15545212-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-5644244437en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros102187-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-5644244437&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issue11en_US
dc.identifier.spage1163en_US
dc.identifier.epage1172en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000224558900008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, KPY=7404199338en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CCH=16244174500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, TMC=7501437381en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuiChan, CWY=7003462071en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats