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Article: Two variations of a novel search task to investigate the nature and limits of the distribution of visual attention

TitleTwo variations of a novel search task to investigate the nature and limits of the distribution of visual attention
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
Journal Of Vision, 2002, v. 2 n. 7, p. 736a How to Cite?
AbstractIn order to demonstrate that attention is distributed disjointly, we created a search task with a high penalty for attention to intervening areas. The area to which observers must attend is defined by a square-wave grating. A single target is located in one of the even strips (along with distractors), and ten false targets (identical to the real target) are located in the odd strips (also with distractors). To successfully report the location of the real target (versus the many false ones), the observer must both attend even strips and strongly ignore odd strips. With only two strips, one above, one below fixation (or one left, one right of fixation), it is easy to attend to one and ignore the other. As the number of strips increases, performance declines. Yet even with 12 strips, including six disjoint attended areas, analysis shows that all six strips are - to some degree - attended, and the intervening strips are - to a greater extent - unattended. A color-coded square wave grating (instruction grating) is used to indicate the areas to be attended and ignored. In one version of the task, the instruction grating is turned off before stimulus presentation. In another version, the instruction grating remains on, superimposed on the search stimulus. The data from both procedures indicate the attenuation of attentional modulation (between attended and unattended areas) with increases in spatial frequency. The results from these tasks are a critical ingredient for models of the distribution of spatial attention across the visual field as a combination of attentional modulation and visual acuity.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169040
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGobell, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorTseng, CHen_US
dc.contributor.authorSperling, Gen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:41:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:41:03Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Vision, 2002, v. 2 n. 7, p. 736aen_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169040-
dc.description.abstractIn order to demonstrate that attention is distributed disjointly, we created a search task with a high penalty for attention to intervening areas. The area to which observers must attend is defined by a square-wave grating. A single target is located in one of the even strips (along with distractors), and ten false targets (identical to the real target) are located in the odd strips (also with distractors). To successfully report the location of the real target (versus the many false ones), the observer must both attend even strips and strongly ignore odd strips. With only two strips, one above, one below fixation (or one left, one right of fixation), it is easy to attend to one and ignore the other. As the number of strips increases, performance declines. Yet even with 12 strips, including six disjoint attended areas, analysis shows that all six strips are - to some degree - attended, and the intervening strips are - to a greater extent - unattended. A color-coded square wave grating (instruction grating) is used to indicate the areas to be attended and ignored. In one version of the task, the instruction grating is turned off before stimulus presentation. In another version, the instruction grating remains on, superimposed on the search stimulus. The data from both procedures indicate the attenuation of attentional modulation (between attended and unattended areas) with increases in spatial frequency. The results from these tasks are a critical ingredient for models of the distribution of spatial attention across the visual field as a combination of attentional modulation and visual acuity.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.titleTwo variations of a novel search task to investigate the nature and limits of the distribution of visual attentionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTseng, CH:tseng@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTseng, CH=rp00640en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/2.7.736en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4243088023en_US
dc.identifier.volume2en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.spage736aen_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGobell, J=6602576418en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTseng, CH=7402541752en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSperling, G=7006467228en_US

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