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Article: Head orientation biases tactile localization

TitleHead orientation biases tactile localization
Authors
KeywordsHead orientation
Localization
Spatial display
Touch
Vibrotactile
Issue Date2007
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/brainres
Citation
Brain Research, 2007, v. 1144 n. 1, p. 136-141 How to Cite?
AbstractDoes the perceived location of tactile stimuli presented on the torso depend on the orientation of our heads with respect to our bodies? An experiment is reported that was designed to assess whether the subjective perception of tactile stimuli on the torso changes as people turn their heads in different directions. Our participants used a scale presented on a computer monitor to indicate the perceived position of vibrotactile stimuli presented to one of eight different positions around the frontal side of their waist while they either looked straight ahead, turned their head to the left, or else turned their head to the right. The results showed that the perceived location of tactile stimuli was systematically influenced by head orientation. In particular, the perceived location of the tactile stimuli shifted away from their actual position in the direction opposite to the direction of the participant's head turn. Our results also revealed a systematic decline in the accuracy of tactile localization as a function of the physical distance of the tactile stimuli from the participant's navel. These results echo related findings in the auditory domain where it has been shown that changes in eye position affect auditory lateralization. Our results also have important implications for the design of tactile displays for presenting directional information in a variety of real-world applications. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169020
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.561
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.351
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSpence, Cen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:40:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:40:49Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBrain Research, 2007, v. 1144 n. 1, p. 136-141en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0006-8993en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169020-
dc.description.abstractDoes the perceived location of tactile stimuli presented on the torso depend on the orientation of our heads with respect to our bodies? An experiment is reported that was designed to assess whether the subjective perception of tactile stimuli on the torso changes as people turn their heads in different directions. Our participants used a scale presented on a computer monitor to indicate the perceived position of vibrotactile stimuli presented to one of eight different positions around the frontal side of their waist while they either looked straight ahead, turned their head to the left, or else turned their head to the right. The results showed that the perceived location of tactile stimuli was systematically influenced by head orientation. In particular, the perceived location of the tactile stimuli shifted away from their actual position in the direction opposite to the direction of the participant's head turn. Our results also revealed a systematic decline in the accuracy of tactile localization as a function of the physical distance of the tactile stimuli from the participant's navel. These results echo related findings in the auditory domain where it has been shown that changes in eye position affect auditory lateralization. Our results also have important implications for the design of tactile displays for presenting directional information in a variety of real-world applications. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/brainresen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBrain Researchen_HK
dc.subjectHead orientationen_HK
dc.subjectLocalizationen_HK
dc.subjectSpatial displayen_HK
dc.subjectTouchen_HK
dc.subjectVibrotactileen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAnalysis Of Varianceen_US
dc.subject.meshDiscrimination (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFunctional Lateralityen_US
dc.subject.meshHeaden_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshOrientation - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPerception - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysical Stimulation - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshPosture - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTouch - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshVibrationen_US
dc.titleHead orientation biases tactile localizationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, C: cristyho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, C=rp00859en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.brainres.2007.01.091en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17320836-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33947324734en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33947324734&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume1144en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage136en_HK
dc.identifier.epage141en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000246034100015-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, C=8697555100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSpence, C=7102013693en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike1607771-

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