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Article: Neural correlates of foveal splitting in reading: Evidence from an ERP study of Chinese character recognition

TitleNeural correlates of foveal splitting in reading: Evidence from an ERP study of Chinese character recognition
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/neuropsychologia
Citation
Neuropsychologia, 2007, v. 45 n. 6, p. 1280-1292 How to Cite?
AbstractRecent research on foveal structure and reading suggests that the two halves of a centrally fixated word seem to be initially projected to, and processed in, different hemispheres. In the current study, we utilize two contrasting structures in Chinese orthography, "SP" (the semantic radical on the left and the phonetic radical on the right) and "PS" characters (the opposite structure), to examine foveal splitting effects in event-related potential (ERP) recordings. We showed that when participants silently named centrally presented characters, there was a significant interaction between character type and hemisphere in N1 amplitude: SP characters elicited larger N1 compared with PS characters in the left hemisphere, whereas the right hemisphere had the opposite pattern. This effect is consistent with the split fovea claim, suggesting that the two halves of a character may be initially projected to and processed in different hemispheres. There was no such interaction observed in an earlier component P1. Also, there was an interaction between character type and sex of the reader in N350 amplitude. This result is consistent with Hsiao and Shillcock's [Hsiao, J. H., & Shillcock, R. (2005b). Foveal splitting causes differential processing of Chinese orthography in the male and female brain. Cognitive Brain Research, 25, 531-536] behavioural study, which showed a similar interaction in naming response time. They argued that this effect was due to a more left-lateralized network for phonological processing in the male brain compared with the female brain. The results hence showed that foveal splitting effects in visual word recognition were observed in N1 the earliest, and could extend far enough to interact with the sex of the reader as revealed in N350. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169016
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.989
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.072
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHsiao, JHwen_US
dc.contributor.authorShillcock, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Cyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:40:46Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:40:46Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationNeuropsychologia, 2007, v. 45 n. 6, p. 1280-1292en_US
dc.identifier.issn0028-3932en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169016-
dc.description.abstractRecent research on foveal structure and reading suggests that the two halves of a centrally fixated word seem to be initially projected to, and processed in, different hemispheres. In the current study, we utilize two contrasting structures in Chinese orthography, "SP" (the semantic radical on the left and the phonetic radical on the right) and "PS" characters (the opposite structure), to examine foveal splitting effects in event-related potential (ERP) recordings. We showed that when participants silently named centrally presented characters, there was a significant interaction between character type and hemisphere in N1 amplitude: SP characters elicited larger N1 compared with PS characters in the left hemisphere, whereas the right hemisphere had the opposite pattern. This effect is consistent with the split fovea claim, suggesting that the two halves of a character may be initially projected to and processed in different hemispheres. There was no such interaction observed in an earlier component P1. Also, there was an interaction between character type and sex of the reader in N350 amplitude. This result is consistent with Hsiao and Shillcock's [Hsiao, J. H., & Shillcock, R. (2005b). Foveal splitting causes differential processing of Chinese orthography in the male and female brain. Cognitive Brain Research, 25, 531-536] behavioural study, which showed a similar interaction in naming response time. They argued that this effect was due to a more left-lateralized network for phonological processing in the male brain compared with the female brain. The results hence showed that foveal splitting effects in visual word recognition were observed in N1 the earliest, and could extend far enough to interact with the sex of the reader as revealed in N350. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/neuropsychologiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNeuropsychologiaen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshElectroencephalographyen_US
dc.subject.meshEvoked Potentials, Visual - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFovea Centralis - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFunctional Laterality - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImage Processing, Computer-Assisteden_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPhotic Stimulationen_US
dc.subject.meshReadingen_US
dc.subject.meshRecognition (Psychology) - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Characteristicsen_US
dc.subject.meshVision, Binocular - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleNeural correlates of foveal splitting in reading: Evidence from an ERP study of Chinese character recognitionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHsiao, JHw:jhsiao@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHsiao, JHw=rp00632en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2006.10.001en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17098263-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1876781-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33846185863en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33846185863&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume45en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage1280en_US
dc.identifier.epage1292en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000245130900014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHsiao, JHw=7101605473en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShillcock, R=6603785348en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, Cy=7410158999en_US

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