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Article: Perception of surface slant from oriented textures

TitlePerception of surface slant from oriented textures
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
Journal Of Vision, 2006, v. 6 n. 9, p. 882-897 How to Cite?
AbstractWhen a surface covered with a regular texture is viewed in perspective, the projected texture provides a number of cues to 3D surface orientation. For oriented textures, one cue is perspective convergence: symmetry lines that are parallel along the surface project to lines that vary systematically in orientation. We investigated the contribution of perspective convergence to perception of 3D slant and tested whether slant from convergence depends on oriented spectral components. Subjects judged the sign of slant about a vertical axis of rotation. Textures were composed of filled circles in three spatial arrangements: a hex grid with symmetry lines at 0 and ±60 deg relative to the tilt direction (aligned condition), a hex grid with symmetry lines at 90 and ±30 deg (perpendicular condition), and random arrangements with similar average spacing (isotropic condition). The two hex grid textures differed in the amount of spectral energy present in the tilt direction (horizontal) but were otherwise closely matched. Slant discrimination thresholds for monocular stimuli were higher for isotropic textures than for either of the two hex grid textures and were higher for the perpendicular texture than for the aligned texture. In a second experiment, we measured the weight given to texture relative to binocular slant information for cue conflict stimuli (±5 deg). Weights were found to agree with individual subjects' monocular thresholds, in accordance with optimal estimation theory. We conclude that the visual system uses perspective convergence to perceive slant and that effective use of convergence requires the presence of spectral components aligned with the tilt direction. © 2006 ARVO.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169008
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, JAen_US
dc.contributor.authorBackus, BTen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:40:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:40:43Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Vision, 2006, v. 6 n. 9, p. 882-897en_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169008-
dc.description.abstractWhen a surface covered with a regular texture is viewed in perspective, the projected texture provides a number of cues to 3D surface orientation. For oriented textures, one cue is perspective convergence: symmetry lines that are parallel along the surface project to lines that vary systematically in orientation. We investigated the contribution of perspective convergence to perception of 3D slant and tested whether slant from convergence depends on oriented spectral components. Subjects judged the sign of slant about a vertical axis of rotation. Textures were composed of filled circles in three spatial arrangements: a hex grid with symmetry lines at 0 and ±60 deg relative to the tilt direction (aligned condition), a hex grid with symmetry lines at 90 and ±30 deg (perpendicular condition), and random arrangements with similar average spacing (isotropic condition). The two hex grid textures differed in the amount of spectral energy present in the tilt direction (horizontal) but were otherwise closely matched. Slant discrimination thresholds for monocular stimuli were higher for isotropic textures than for either of the two hex grid textures and were higher for the perpendicular texture than for the aligned texture. In a second experiment, we measured the weight given to texture relative to binocular slant information for cue conflict stimuli (±5 deg). Weights were found to agree with individual subjects' monocular thresholds, in accordance with optimal estimation theory. We conclude that the visual system uses perspective convergence to perceive slant and that effective use of convergence requires the presence of spectral components aligned with the tilt direction. © 2006 ARVO.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.subject.meshCuesen_US
dc.subject.meshDepth Perceptionen_US
dc.subject.meshDiscrimination (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.meshForm Perceptionen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Psychologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshOrientationen_US
dc.subject.meshPhotic Stimulation - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychophysicsen_US
dc.subject.meshRotationen_US
dc.subject.meshSensory Thresholdsen_US
dc.subject.meshVision, Binocularen_US
dc.subject.meshVision, Monocularen_US
dc.subject.meshVisual Perceptionen_US
dc.titlePerception of surface slant from oriented texturesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSaunders, JA:jsaun@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySaunders, JA=rp00638en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/6.9.3en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17083282en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33747162713en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33747162713&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume6en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage882en_US
dc.identifier.epage897en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000243594000003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSaunders, JA=7402341514en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBackus, BT=7003366612en_US

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