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Article: The differential effect of vibrotactile and auditory cues on visual spatial attention

TitleThe differential effect of vibrotactile and auditory cues on visual spatial attention
Authors
KeywordsAuditory
Crossmodal spatial attention
Driving
Vibrotactile
Visual
Warning signal
Issue Date2006
PublisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00140139.asp
Citation
Ergonomics, 2006, v. 49 n. 7, p. 724-738 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious research has shown that the presentation of spatially predictive auditory and vibrotactile warning signals can facilitate driver responses to driving events seen through the windscreen or rearview mirror. The present study investigated whether this facilitation reflects the priming of the appropriate response (i.e. braking vs. accelerating) or an attentional cuing effect (i.e. a perceptual benefit that facilitates subsequent behavioural responding). In the experiments reported here, participants had to discriminate the colour of a number plate (red vs. blue) following the presentation of either spatially predictive vibrotactile (experiment 1) or auditory (experiment 2) warning signals that indicated the likely location (front or back) of the visual target, while simultaneously performing a highly attention-demanding rapid serial visual presentation task. Numberplate discrimination performance was facilitated following the presentation of valid auditory cues, but not following the presentation of equally informative vibrotactile cues. The use of an orthogonal spatial cuing design enabled with us to rule out of a potential response priming account of these data. The results suggest that whilst directional congruency between a warning signal and a target event may be sufficient to facilitate performance due to the priming of the appropriate response, attentional facilitation effects may also require the co-location of the cue and target within the same functional region of space. © 2006 Taylor & Francis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169006
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.449
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.962
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTan, HZen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSpence, Cen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:40:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:40:43Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationErgonomics, 2006, v. 49 n. 7, p. 724-738en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0014-0139en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169006-
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has shown that the presentation of spatially predictive auditory and vibrotactile warning signals can facilitate driver responses to driving events seen through the windscreen or rearview mirror. The present study investigated whether this facilitation reflects the priming of the appropriate response (i.e. braking vs. accelerating) or an attentional cuing effect (i.e. a perceptual benefit that facilitates subsequent behavioural responding). In the experiments reported here, participants had to discriminate the colour of a number plate (red vs. blue) following the presentation of either spatially predictive vibrotactile (experiment 1) or auditory (experiment 2) warning signals that indicated the likely location (front or back) of the visual target, while simultaneously performing a highly attention-demanding rapid serial visual presentation task. Numberplate discrimination performance was facilitated following the presentation of valid auditory cues, but not following the presentation of equally informative vibrotactile cues. The use of an orthogonal spatial cuing design enabled with us to rule out of a potential response priming account of these data. The results suggest that whilst directional congruency between a warning signal and a target event may be sufficient to facilitate performance due to the priming of the appropriate response, attentional facilitation effects may also require the co-location of the cue and target within the same functional region of space. © 2006 Taylor & Francis.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00140139.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofErgonomicsen_HK
dc.subjectAuditoryen_HK
dc.subjectCrossmodal spatial attentionen_HK
dc.subjectDrivingen_HK
dc.subjectVibrotactileen_HK
dc.subjectVisualen_HK
dc.subjectWarning signalen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAttentionen_US
dc.subject.meshAutomobile Drivingen_US
dc.subject.meshCuesen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshReaction Timeen_US
dc.subject.meshSound Localizationen_US
dc.subject.meshSpace Perceptionen_US
dc.subject.meshVibrationen_US
dc.subject.meshVisual Perceptionen_US
dc.titleThe differential effect of vibrotactile and auditory cues on visual spatial attentionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, C: cristyho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, C=rp00859en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00140130600589887en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16720531-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33744718742en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33744718742&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume49en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage724en_HK
dc.identifier.epage738en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000237730200007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, C=8697555100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, HZ=7403011722en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSpence, C=7102013693en_HK

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