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Article: A TMS examination of semantic radical combinability effects in Chinese character recognition

TitleA TMS examination of semantic radical combinability effects in Chinese character recognition
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/brainres
Citation
Brain Research, 2006, v. 1078 n. 1, p. 159-167 How to Cite?
AbstractThe proposal of human foveal splitting assumes a vertical meridian split in the foveal representation and the consequent contralateral projection of information in the two hemifields to the two hemispheres and has been shown to have important implications for visual word recognition. According to this assumption, in Chinese character recognition, the two halves of a centrally fixated character may be initially projected to and processed in different hemispheres. Here, we describe a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) investigation of hemispheric processing in Chinese character recognition, through examining semantic radical combinability effects in a character semantic judgment task. The materials used were a dominant type of Chinese character which consists of a semantic radical on the left and a phonetic radical on the right. Thus, according to the split fovea assumption, the semantic and phonetic radicals are initially projected to and processed in the right hemisphere and the left hemisphere, respectively. We show that rTMS over the left occipital cortex impaired the facilitation of semantic radicals with large combinability, whereas right occipital rTMS did not. This interaction between stimulation site and radical combinability reveals a flexible division of labor between the hemispheres in Chinese character recognition, with each hemisphere responding optimally to the information in the contralateral visual hemifield to which it has direct access. The results are also consistent with the split fovea claim, suggesting functional foveal splitting as a universal processing constraint in reading. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169004
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.561
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.351
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHsiao, JHwen_US
dc.contributor.authorShillcock, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorLavidor, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:40:41Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:40:41Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationBrain Research, 2006, v. 1078 n. 1, p. 159-167en_US
dc.identifier.issn0006-8993en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169004-
dc.description.abstractThe proposal of human foveal splitting assumes a vertical meridian split in the foveal representation and the consequent contralateral projection of information in the two hemifields to the two hemispheres and has been shown to have important implications for visual word recognition. According to this assumption, in Chinese character recognition, the two halves of a centrally fixated character may be initially projected to and processed in different hemispheres. Here, we describe a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) investigation of hemispheric processing in Chinese character recognition, through examining semantic radical combinability effects in a character semantic judgment task. The materials used were a dominant type of Chinese character which consists of a semantic radical on the left and a phonetic radical on the right. Thus, according to the split fovea assumption, the semantic and phonetic radicals are initially projected to and processed in the right hemisphere and the left hemisphere, respectively. We show that rTMS over the left occipital cortex impaired the facilitation of semantic radicals with large combinability, whereas right occipital rTMS did not. This interaction between stimulation site and radical combinability reveals a flexible division of labor between the hemispheres in Chinese character recognition, with each hemisphere responding optimally to the information in the contralateral visual hemifield to which it has direct access. The results are also consistent with the split fovea claim, suggesting functional foveal splitting as a universal processing constraint in reading. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/brainresen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBrain Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Groupen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFunctional Laterality - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshJudgment - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPattern Recognition, Visual - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhotic Stimulation - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshReaction Time - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRecognition (Psychology) - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSemanticsen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTranscranial Magnetic Stimulationen_US
dc.subject.meshVocabularyen_US
dc.titleA TMS examination of semantic radical combinability effects in Chinese character recognitionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHsiao, JHw:jhsiao@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHsiao, JHw=rp00632en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.brainres.2006.01.072en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16499892-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645877943en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33645877943&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume1078en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage159en_US
dc.identifier.epage167en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000236977800015-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHsiao, JHw=7101605473en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShillcock, R=6603785348en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLavidor, M=6603808391en_US

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