File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Foveal splitting causes differential processing of Chinese orthography in the male and female brain

TitleFoveal splitting causes differential processing of Chinese orthography in the male and female brain
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cogbrainres
Citation
Cognitive Brain Research, 2005, v. 25 n. 2, p. 531-536 How to Cite?
AbstractChinese characters contain separate phonetic and semantic radicals. A dominant character type exists in which the semantic radical is on the left and the phonetic radical on the right; an opposite, minority structure also exists, with the semantic radical on the right and the phonetic radical on the left. We show that, when asked to pronounce isolated tokens of these two character types, males responded significantly faster when the phonetic information was on the right, whereas females showed a non-significant tendency in the opposite direction. Recent research on foveal structure and reading suggests that the two halves of a centrally fixated character are initially processed in different hemispheres. The male brain typically relies more on the left hemisphere for phonological processing compared with the female brain, causing this gender difference to emerge. This interaction is predicted by an implemented computational model. This study supports the existence of a gender difference in phonological processing, and shows that the effects of foveal splitting in reading extend far enough into word recognition to interact with the gender of the reader in a naturalistic reading task. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168994
ISSN
2007 Impact Factor: 3.769
2008 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.305
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHsiao, JHWen_US
dc.contributor.authorShillcock, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:40:32Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:40:32Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationCognitive Brain Research, 2005, v. 25 n. 2, p. 531-536en_US
dc.identifier.issn0926-6410en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168994-
dc.description.abstractChinese characters contain separate phonetic and semantic radicals. A dominant character type exists in which the semantic radical is on the left and the phonetic radical on the right; an opposite, minority structure also exists, with the semantic radical on the right and the phonetic radical on the left. We show that, when asked to pronounce isolated tokens of these two character types, males responded significantly faster when the phonetic information was on the right, whereas females showed a non-significant tendency in the opposite direction. Recent research on foveal structure and reading suggests that the two halves of a centrally fixated character are initially processed in different hemispheres. The male brain typically relies more on the left hemisphere for phonological processing compared with the female brain, causing this gender difference to emerge. This interaction is predicted by an implemented computational model. This study supports the existence of a gender difference in phonological processing, and shows that the effects of foveal splitting in reading extend far enough into word recognition to interact with the gender of the reader in a naturalistic reading task. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cogbrainresen_US
dc.relation.ispartofCognitive Brain Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Mappingen_US
dc.subject.meshDominance, Cerebral - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLanguageen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMental Processes - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPattern Recognition, Visual - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhoneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshReaction Time - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Characteristicsen_US
dc.subject.meshVisual Fieldsen_US
dc.subject.meshVocabularyen_US
dc.titleFoveal splitting causes differential processing of Chinese orthography in the male and female brainen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHsiao, JHW:jhsiao@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHsiao, JHW=rp00632en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.005en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16154326-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-26644445701en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-26644445701&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume25en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage531en_US
dc.identifier.epage536en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000233076400012-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHsiao, JHW=7101605473en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShillcock, R=6603785348en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike341190-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats