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Article: Children's Knowledge of Teen Quantities as Tens and Ones: Comparisons of Chinese, British, and American Kindergartners

TitleChildren's Knowledge of Teen Quantities as Tens and Ones: Comparisons of Chinese, British, and American Kindergartners
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/edu.html
Citation
Journal Of Educational Psychology, 1998, v. 90 n. 3, p. 536-544 How to Cite?
AbstractThree studies were conducted to examine the effects of individual differences and language differences on children's understanding of teen quantities (11 ≤ n ≤ 19) as counted cardinal tens and ones (embedded-ten cardinal understanding). At age 4, most Chinese children, using named-ten number words (e.g., 12 is said as "ten two"), did not show such understanding on a task in which y quantities were added to 10 quantities. At age 5, half the children of average or above intelligence who had high rote-counting sequences (M = 90) did show such understanding; those with lower rote-counting sequences did not. English-speaking 5-year-old children in England and in the United States, whose teen words obfuscate the tens and ones, showed no evidence of understanding teen quantities as cardinal tens and ones.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168969
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.828
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, CSHen_US
dc.contributor.authorFuson, KCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:40:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:40:16Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Educational Psychology, 1998, v. 90 n. 3, p. 536-544en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0663en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168969-
dc.description.abstractThree studies were conducted to examine the effects of individual differences and language differences on children's understanding of teen quantities (11 ≤ n ≤ 19) as counted cardinal tens and ones (embedded-ten cardinal understanding). At age 4, most Chinese children, using named-ten number words (e.g., 12 is said as "ten two"), did not show such understanding on a task in which y quantities were added to 10 quantities. At age 5, half the children of average or above intelligence who had high rote-counting sequences (M = 90) did show such understanding; those with lower rote-counting sequences did not. English-speaking 5-year-old children in England and in the United States, whose teen words obfuscate the tens and ones, showed no evidence of understanding teen quantities as cardinal tens and ones.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/edu.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Educational Psychologyen_US
dc.titleChildren's Knowledge of Teen Quantities as Tens and Ones: Comparisons of Chinese, British, and American Kindergartnersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, CSH:shhoc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, CSH=rp00631en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0041060906en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0041060906&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume90en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage536en_US
dc.identifier.epage544en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, CSH=35095289900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFuson, KC=6701501364en_US

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