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Conference Paper: Verbal interface design: Do verbal directional cues automatically orient visual spatial attention?

TitleVerbal interface design: Do verbal directional cues automatically orient visual spatial attention?
Authors
KeywordsDirectional cue
Exogenous orienting
Verbal interface design
Visual spatial attention
Issue Date2006
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/comphumbeh
Citation
Computers In Human Behavior, 2006, v. 22 n. 4, p. 733-748 How to Cite?
AbstractThe last few years have seen a rapid growth of interest in the use of verbal information displays in many applied interface settings. However, to date, it is unclear what effect the presentation of verbal cues, such as the words 'left' or 'right', has on the spatial distribution of an interface operator's attention. In the present study, we addressed this issue by investigating whether centrally-presented spatially-nonpredictive verbal directional cues elicit an automatic shift of visual spatial attention in the direction indicated by the cue. Participants performed a digit discrimination task for targets presented on either the left or right. Prior to target presentation, the directional word cues 'left' or 'right' were presented auditorily or visually from the centre of the display at cue-target stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) of 200, 400, or 600 ms. Visual discrimination performance was assessed both under conditions where the target digits were unmasked (auditory and visual cuing), and when the targets were masked (auditory cuing only). The results showed that unmasked visual target discrimination performance was facilitated on the cued (relative to the uncued) side at the shortest SOA following visual cuing, but was unaffected by auditorily-presented directional cues. Interestingly, our results also indicated improved visual sensitivity on the auditorily-cued side in the masked target condition. These findings are discussed in relation to previous laboratory-based and applied symbolic cuing studies that have investigated the consequences of the presentation of arrow, gaze direction, and/or head orientation directional cues on the spatial distribution of attention. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168886
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.88
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.646
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSpence, Cen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:37:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:37:49Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationComputers In Human Behavior, 2006, v. 22 n. 4, p. 733-748en_US
dc.identifier.issn0747-5632en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168886-
dc.description.abstractThe last few years have seen a rapid growth of interest in the use of verbal information displays in many applied interface settings. However, to date, it is unclear what effect the presentation of verbal cues, such as the words 'left' or 'right', has on the spatial distribution of an interface operator's attention. In the present study, we addressed this issue by investigating whether centrally-presented spatially-nonpredictive verbal directional cues elicit an automatic shift of visual spatial attention in the direction indicated by the cue. Participants performed a digit discrimination task for targets presented on either the left or right. Prior to target presentation, the directional word cues 'left' or 'right' were presented auditorily or visually from the centre of the display at cue-target stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) of 200, 400, or 600 ms. Visual discrimination performance was assessed both under conditions where the target digits were unmasked (auditory and visual cuing), and when the targets were masked (auditory cuing only). The results showed that unmasked visual target discrimination performance was facilitated on the cued (relative to the uncued) side at the shortest SOA following visual cuing, but was unaffected by auditorily-presented directional cues. Interestingly, our results also indicated improved visual sensitivity on the auditorily-cued side in the masked target condition. These findings are discussed in relation to previous laboratory-based and applied symbolic cuing studies that have investigated the consequences of the presentation of arrow, gaze direction, and/or head orientation directional cues on the spatial distribution of attention. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/comphumbehen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofComputers in Human Behavioren_HK
dc.subjectDirectional cueen_HK
dc.subjectExogenous orientingen_HK
dc.subjectVerbal interface designen_HK
dc.subjectVisual spatial attentionen_HK
dc.titleVerbal interface design: Do verbal directional cues automatically orient visual spatial attention?en_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, C: cristyho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, C=rp00859en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chb.2005.12.008en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33144456964en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33144456964&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume22en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage733en_HK
dc.identifier.epage748en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000236158800011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, C=8697555100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSpence, C=7102013693en_HK

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