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Article: Achieving Sustainable Urban Renewal in Hong Kong: Strategy for Dilapidation Assessment of High Rises

TitleAchieving Sustainable Urban Renewal in Hong Kong: Strategy for Dilapidation Assessment of High Rises
Authors
KeywordsBuilding Conditions
Building Rehabilitation
Decision Tool
Redevelopment
Urban Renewal
Issue Date2012
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pubs.asce.org/journals/up.html
Citation
Journal Of Urban Planning And Development, 2012, v. 138 n. 2, p. 153-165 How to Cite?
AbstractApproximately 4% of the private buildings in Hong Kong are older than their design lives of 50 years. In addition to the engineering factor, the lack of timely maintenance and proper management has led to a serious problem of building dilapidation in the old urban areas. On account of the high-rise high-density urban setting in Hong Kong, the problem has engendered severe safety and health hazards for the local community. Although different ways of urban renewal or regeneration exist to revitalize the urban environment, it appears that redevelopment is most frequently used. However, the speed of dilapidation would probably exceed the economy's capability of absorbing redevelopments. In addition, redevelopments have detrimental effects on the social fabric and create a large volume of demolition and construction waste that greatly surpasses the current landfill capacity in Hong Kong. A sustainable strategy for urban renewal is, therefore, urgently needed. This research aims to establish an existing profile of the building conditions in Hong Kong and evaluate the suitability of various urban renewal strategies for different buildings through the establishment of a structured building assessment scheme called the Dilapidation Index (DI). In total, 393 private residential buildings randomly selected from 4 districts in Hong Kong were assessed by using the DI. The results indicated that the assessed buildings in Sham Shui Po were more problematic than those in other districts. The results also suggested that physical conditions and management factors play nearly equal parts in differentiating the well-performing buildings from the dilapidated ones. The DI developed in this research is beneficial to different parties with an interest in the quality of the urban built environment because it can help people identify problematic buildings for further actions. © 2012 American Society of Civil Engineers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168788
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.246
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.619
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, DCWen_US
dc.contributor.authorYau, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorPoon, SWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiusman, Een_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:32:27Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:32:27Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Urban Planning And Development, 2012, v. 138 n. 2, p. 153-165en_US
dc.identifier.issn0733-9488en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168788-
dc.description.abstractApproximately 4% of the private buildings in Hong Kong are older than their design lives of 50 years. In addition to the engineering factor, the lack of timely maintenance and proper management has led to a serious problem of building dilapidation in the old urban areas. On account of the high-rise high-density urban setting in Hong Kong, the problem has engendered severe safety and health hazards for the local community. Although different ways of urban renewal or regeneration exist to revitalize the urban environment, it appears that redevelopment is most frequently used. However, the speed of dilapidation would probably exceed the economy's capability of absorbing redevelopments. In addition, redevelopments have detrimental effects on the social fabric and create a large volume of demolition and construction waste that greatly surpasses the current landfill capacity in Hong Kong. A sustainable strategy for urban renewal is, therefore, urgently needed. This research aims to establish an existing profile of the building conditions in Hong Kong and evaluate the suitability of various urban renewal strategies for different buildings through the establishment of a structured building assessment scheme called the Dilapidation Index (DI). In total, 393 private residential buildings randomly selected from 4 districts in Hong Kong were assessed by using the DI. The results indicated that the assessed buildings in Sham Shui Po were more problematic than those in other districts. The results also suggested that physical conditions and management factors play nearly equal parts in differentiating the well-performing buildings from the dilapidated ones. The DI developed in this research is beneficial to different parties with an interest in the quality of the urban built environment because it can help people identify problematic buildings for further actions. © 2012 American Society of Civil Engineers.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pubs.asce.org/journals/up.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Urban Planning and Developmenten_US
dc.rightsJournal of Urban Planning and Development. Copyright © American Society of Civil Engineers.-
dc.subjectBuilding Conditionsen_US
dc.subjectBuilding Rehabilitationen_US
dc.subjectDecision Toolen_US
dc.subjectRedevelopmenten_US
dc.subjectUrban Renewalen_US
dc.titleAchieving Sustainable Urban Renewal in Hong Kong: Strategy for Dilapidation Assessment of High Risesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, DCW:danielho@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, DCW=rp01001en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1061/(ASCE)UP.1943-5444.0000104en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862195683en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros202597-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84862195683&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume138en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage153en_US
dc.identifier.epage165en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1943-5444-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000305091500006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, DCW=12805583800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYau, Y=12806101900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, SW=55248225000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiusman, E=55248316700en_US

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