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Article: Are our residential buildings healthy and safe? A survey in Hong Kong

TitleAre our residential buildings healthy and safe? A survey in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsBuildings
Health And Safety
Hong Kong
Residential Property
Issue Date2006
PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/ss.htm
Citation
Structural Survey, 2006, v. 24 n. 1, p. 77-86 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose - The most fundamental requirement of a habitable building is that its occupants can live in it healthily and safely. However, given the proliferation of building-related accidents recently in Hong Kong, the extent to which our buildings have fulfilled this basic requirement is doubtful. For the benefit of the entire society, more public information on building quality is needed. Aims to address this issue. Design/methodology/approach - This paper extends the Ho et al. assessment model to evaluate the combined health and safety performance of residential buildings in Hong Kong. The model consists of a performance-based objectives and can be translated into a hierarchy of parameters concerning the quality of building design, building management, and the surrounding environment. A total of 99 residential buildings in two urban areas, namely Mongkok and Tsimshatsui, were assessed with the help of a simple and user-friendly performance indicator called the Building Quality Index (BQI). Findings - The comparative analysis showed that the overall health and safety performance varied significantly with building age and development scale. Building location did not matter in overall performance, but became relevant in disaggregate performances regarding the external environment and building management approaches. Research limitations/implications - In theory, building management and building location are not related. Further research is needed to disentangle the management effect from the location effect. Practical implications - The assessment method is a simple and cost-effective screening tool for mass building assessment at the city level. It can also be used for classifying buildings into different grades in respect of health and safety, providing incentives to building owners, developers, and government bodies to improve the living environment. Originality/value - The study contributes to a better understanding of the relationship between building performance and its physical characteristics, including location, age, and development scale, in a densely populated high-rise urban area. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168735
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.262
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, SKen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, AKCen_US
dc.contributor.authorYau, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, DCWen_US
dc.contributor.authorChau, KWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:31:56Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:31:56Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationStructural Survey, 2006, v. 24 n. 1, p. 77-86en_US
dc.identifier.issn0263-080Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168735-
dc.description.abstractPurpose - The most fundamental requirement of a habitable building is that its occupants can live in it healthily and safely. However, given the proliferation of building-related accidents recently in Hong Kong, the extent to which our buildings have fulfilled this basic requirement is doubtful. For the benefit of the entire society, more public information on building quality is needed. Aims to address this issue. Design/methodology/approach - This paper extends the Ho et al. assessment model to evaluate the combined health and safety performance of residential buildings in Hong Kong. The model consists of a performance-based objectives and can be translated into a hierarchy of parameters concerning the quality of building design, building management, and the surrounding environment. A total of 99 residential buildings in two urban areas, namely Mongkok and Tsimshatsui, were assessed with the help of a simple and user-friendly performance indicator called the Building Quality Index (BQI). Findings - The comparative analysis showed that the overall health and safety performance varied significantly with building age and development scale. Building location did not matter in overall performance, but became relevant in disaggregate performances regarding the external environment and building management approaches. Research limitations/implications - In theory, building management and building location are not related. Further research is needed to disentangle the management effect from the location effect. Practical implications - The assessment method is a simple and cost-effective screening tool for mass building assessment at the city level. It can also be used for classifying buildings into different grades in respect of health and safety, providing incentives to building owners, developers, and government bodies to improve the living environment. Originality/value - The study contributes to a better understanding of the relationship between building performance and its physical characteristics, including location, age, and development scale, in a densely populated high-rise urban area. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/ss.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofStructural Surveyen_US
dc.subjectBuildingsen_US
dc.subjectHealth And Safetyen_US
dc.subjectHong Kongen_US
dc.subjectResidential Propertyen_US
dc.titleAre our residential buildings healthy and safe? A survey in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, SK: kelvin.wong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, DCW: danielho@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChau, KW: hrrbckw@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, SK=rp01028en_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, DCW=rp01001en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChau, KW=rp00993en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/02630800610654432en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645733224en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros118635-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33645733224&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume24en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage77en_US
dc.identifier.epage86en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SK=7404591021en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, AKC=12805846100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYau, Y=12806101900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, DCW=12805583800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChau, KW=24830082500en_US

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