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Article: Supplementation with probiotics modifies gut flora and attenuates liver fat accumulation in rat nonalcoholic fatty liver disease model

TitleSupplementation with probiotics modifies gut flora and attenuates liver fat accumulation in rat nonalcoholic fatty liver disease model
Authors
KeywordsBifidobacterium
Fat-Rich Diet
Intestinal Permeability
Lactobacillus
Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (Nafld)
Issue Date2012
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Biochemistry And Nutrition, 2012, v. 50 n. 1, p. 72-77 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study aimed to evaluate the relationship between gut probiotic flora and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in a diet-induced rat model, and to compare the effects of two different probiotic strains on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 4 groups for 12 weeks: control (standard rat chow), model (fat-rich diet), Lactobacillus (fat-rich diet plus Lactobacillus acidophilus), and Bifidobacterium (fat-rich diet plus Bifidobacterium longum) groups. Probiotics were provided to rats in drinking water (10 10/ml). Gut bifidobacteria and lactobacilli were obviously lower at weeks 8 and 10, respectively, in the model group compared with the control group. Supplementation with Bifidobacterium significantly attenuated hepatic fat accumulation (0.10 ± 0.03 g/g liver tissue) compared with the model group (0.16 ± 0.03 g/g liver tissue). However, there was no improvement in intestinal permeability in either the Lactobacillus or the Bifido-bacterium group compared with the model group. In all 40 rats, the hepatic total lipid content was negatively correlated with gut Lactobacillus (r = -0.623, p = 0.004) and Bifidobacterium (r = -0.591, p = 0.008). Oral supplementation with probiotics attenuates hepatic fat accumulation. Further, Bifidobacterium longum is superior in terms of attenuating liver fat accumulation than is Lactobacillus acidophilus. ©2012 JCBN.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168601
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.694
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.762
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXu, RYen_US
dc.contributor.authorWan, YPen_US
dc.contributor.authorFang, QYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLu, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorCai, Wen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:21:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:21:24Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Biochemistry And Nutrition, 2012, v. 50 n. 1, p. 72-77en_US
dc.identifier.issn0912-0009en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/168601-
dc.description.abstractThis study aimed to evaluate the relationship between gut probiotic flora and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in a diet-induced rat model, and to compare the effects of two different probiotic strains on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 4 groups for 12 weeks: control (standard rat chow), model (fat-rich diet), Lactobacillus (fat-rich diet plus Lactobacillus acidophilus), and Bifidobacterium (fat-rich diet plus Bifidobacterium longum) groups. Probiotics were provided to rats in drinking water (10 10/ml). Gut bifidobacteria and lactobacilli were obviously lower at weeks 8 and 10, respectively, in the model group compared with the control group. Supplementation with Bifidobacterium significantly attenuated hepatic fat accumulation (0.10 ± 0.03 g/g liver tissue) compared with the model group (0.16 ± 0.03 g/g liver tissue). However, there was no improvement in intestinal permeability in either the Lactobacillus or the Bifido-bacterium group compared with the model group. In all 40 rats, the hepatic total lipid content was negatively correlated with gut Lactobacillus (r = -0.623, p = 0.004) and Bifidobacterium (r = -0.591, p = 0.008). Oral supplementation with probiotics attenuates hepatic fat accumulation. Further, Bifidobacterium longum is superior in terms of attenuating liver fat accumulation than is Lactobacillus acidophilus. ©2012 JCBN.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutritionen_US
dc.subjectBifidobacteriumen_US
dc.subjectFat-Rich Dieten_US
dc.subjectIntestinal Permeabilityen_US
dc.subjectLactobacillusen_US
dc.subjectNonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (Nafld)en_US
dc.titleSupplementation with probiotics modifies gut flora and attenuates liver fat accumulation in rat nonalcoholic fatty liver disease modelen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLu, W:luwei@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLu, W=rp00754en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3164/jcbn.11-38en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22247604-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84855400121en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84855400121&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume50en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage72en_US
dc.identifier.epage77en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000299498300011-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, RY=13907672600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWan, YP=35270676700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFang, QY=54883529000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, W=27868087600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCai, W=7401711278en_US

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