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Article: Cis-stilbene photochemistry: direct observation of product formation and relaxation through two-color UV pump-probe Raman spectroscopy

TitleCis-stilbene photochemistry: direct observation of product formation and relaxation through two-color UV pump-probe Raman spectroscopy
Authors
Issue Date1993
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chemphys
Citation
Chemical Physics, 1993, v. 175 n. 1, p. 1-12 How to Cite?
AbstractThe formation of hot trans-stilbene by photoisomerization of cis-stilbene, and its subsequent vibrational cooling, have been monitored by picosecond two-color UV pump-probe anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. Pairs of pump (295 nm) and probe (278 nm) pulses at a 500 Hz repetition rate interrogate flowing samples of cis-stilbene in cyclohexane or methanol, and the anti-Stokes Raman scattering due mainly to the trans-stilbene product is detected. Hot ground-state trans-stilbene appears promptly within our 10 ps experimental time resolution, and the anti-Stokes intensity decays with a time constant of 39 ± 10 ps in cyclohexane and 17 ± 5 ps in methanol. The decay of the anti-Stokes intensity is accompanied by a shift of the CC stretching vibrations by about 20 cm-1 to higher frequencies. The question of whether or not the initial vibrational distribution is statistical is addressed, but the present data do not allow firm conclusions to be drawn. © 1993.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167937
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.758
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.719
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, DLen_US
dc.contributor.authorRodier, JMen_US
dc.contributor.authorMyers, ABen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T03:13:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T03:13:09Z-
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.citationChemical Physics, 1993, v. 175 n. 1, p. 1-12en_US
dc.identifier.issn0301-0104en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167937-
dc.description.abstractThe formation of hot trans-stilbene by photoisomerization of cis-stilbene, and its subsequent vibrational cooling, have been monitored by picosecond two-color UV pump-probe anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. Pairs of pump (295 nm) and probe (278 nm) pulses at a 500 Hz repetition rate interrogate flowing samples of cis-stilbene in cyclohexane or methanol, and the anti-Stokes Raman scattering due mainly to the trans-stilbene product is detected. Hot ground-state trans-stilbene appears promptly within our 10 ps experimental time resolution, and the anti-Stokes intensity decays with a time constant of 39 ± 10 ps in cyclohexane and 17 ± 5 ps in methanol. The decay of the anti-Stokes intensity is accompanied by a shift of the CC stretching vibrations by about 20 cm-1 to higher frequencies. The question of whether or not the initial vibrational distribution is statistical is addressed, but the present data do not allow firm conclusions to be drawn. © 1993.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chemphysen_US
dc.relation.ispartofChemical Physicsen_US
dc.titleCis-stilbene photochemistry: direct observation of product formation and relaxation through two-color UV pump-probe Raman spectroscopyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPhillips, DL:phillips@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPhillips, DL=rp00770en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0301-0104(93)80224-W-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-21144477001en_US
dc.identifier.volume175en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage1en_US
dc.identifier.epage12en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1993LV23100002-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPhillips, DL=7404519365en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRodier, JM=7102720856en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMyers, AB=7202743342en_US

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