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postgraduate thesis: The missing watchdog: corruption, governance,and supervisory role for Chinese civil society?

TitleThe missing watchdog: corruption, governance,and supervisory role for Chinese civil society?
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Abstract
This study sought to examine whether pressure from China’s dynamic, yet repressed, civil society had any impact on the Chinese state’s anti-corruption strategies. It was discovered that online activism in China has been on the rise in recent years, and this activism has been working in tandem with the government to monitor public and private corruption, exposing numerous cases online. Increasing trends of online activism seem to be leading to an augmented government anti-corruption strategy that is sensitive to issues exposed on the Internet and to public opinion. As the government sought to shore up its credibility, it was able to harness this wave of public participation to work towards its own ends. Recent reforms in China have attempted to institute public surveillance and monitoring as a central part of the government’s anti-corruption efforts. By illuminating the changing institutional design of the anti-corruption agencies within the Party and the government since the 1990s, this study found that the most recent campaign to rally pubic participation was sincere as the goal of clean government and limited corruption benefit both the government and Chinese society. However, the current anti-corruption regime still has engrained problems and conflicts of interest. Until public surveillance is fully developed and there are more democratic checks and balances, this study does not predict that corruption will be eliminated in China in the near future.
DegreeMaster of Arts in China Development Studies
SubjectCorruption - China.
Dept/ProgramChina Development Studies

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVaughan-Albert, Megan Kate.-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.description.abstractThis study sought to examine whether pressure from China’s dynamic, yet repressed, civil society had any impact on the Chinese state’s anti-corruption strategies. It was discovered that online activism in China has been on the rise in recent years, and this activism has been working in tandem with the government to monitor public and private corruption, exposing numerous cases online. Increasing trends of online activism seem to be leading to an augmented government anti-corruption strategy that is sensitive to issues exposed on the Internet and to public opinion. As the government sought to shore up its credibility, it was able to harness this wave of public participation to work towards its own ends. Recent reforms in China have attempted to institute public surveillance and monitoring as a central part of the government’s anti-corruption efforts. By illuminating the changing institutional design of the anti-corruption agencies within the Party and the government since the 1990s, this study found that the most recent campaign to rally pubic participation was sincere as the goal of clean government and limited corruption benefit both the government and Chinese society. However, the current anti-corruption regime still has engrained problems and conflicts of interest. Until public surveillance is fully developed and there are more democratic checks and balances, this study does not predict that corruption will be eliminated in China in the near future.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B48183465-
dc.subject.lcshCorruption - China.-
dc.titleThe missing watchdog: corruption, governance,and supervisory role for Chinese civil society?-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4818346-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Arts in China Development Studies-
dc.description.thesislevelmaster's-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineChina Development Studies-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.date.hkucongregation2011-

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