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Article: Optimization of stormwater filtration at the urban/watershed interface

TitleOptimization of stormwater filtration at the urban/watershed interface
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/est
Citation
Environmental Science And Technology, 2006, v. 40 n. 15, p. 4794-4801 How to Cite?
AbstractEnvironmental pollution from cities is a major ecological problem attributed to contaminated runoff from nonpoint sources. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's guidance on implementation of total maximum daily loads (TMDL) does not adequately cover methods to improve waters impaired by nonpoint sources. To comply with TMDLs, cities may install filters in curb inlets, or use other Best Management Practices (BMPs). We tested 10 different filters and found their effectiveness in retaining pollutants ranged from 0 to > 90%, depending on combinations of pollutant types (metals, pathogens, and total suspended sediments (TSS)) and filter materials. Hence, the decision to deploy filters into curb inlets must consider land use patterns associated with specific categories of pollutants generated within cities. We developed a geographic information system (GIS)-enabled model for estimating and mitigating emissions of pollutants from urban regions into watersheds. The model uses land use categories and pollutant loadings to optimize strategic placement of filters to accommodate TMDLs. For example, in a city where the landuse pattern generates 4 × 10 6 kg of TSS, 55 kg of Cd, and 2 × 10 3 kg of Zn per year into 498 curb inlets that discharge into a sensitive watershed, the optimized placement of 137, 92, and 148 filters can achieve TMDL endpoints for each pollutant, respectively. We show further that 158 strategically placed filters effectively meet the requirements simultaneously for all three pollutants, a result at least 5 times more effective than random placement of filters. © 2006 American Chemical Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167141
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.393
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.664
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHipp, JAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorOgunseitan, Oen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLejano, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorSmith, CSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-28T04:04:35Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-28T04:04:35Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Science And Technology, 2006, v. 40 n. 15, p. 4794-4801en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0013-936Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167141-
dc.description.abstractEnvironmental pollution from cities is a major ecological problem attributed to contaminated runoff from nonpoint sources. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's guidance on implementation of total maximum daily loads (TMDL) does not adequately cover methods to improve waters impaired by nonpoint sources. To comply with TMDLs, cities may install filters in curb inlets, or use other Best Management Practices (BMPs). We tested 10 different filters and found their effectiveness in retaining pollutants ranged from 0 to > 90%, depending on combinations of pollutant types (metals, pathogens, and total suspended sediments (TSS)) and filter materials. Hence, the decision to deploy filters into curb inlets must consider land use patterns associated with specific categories of pollutants generated within cities. We developed a geographic information system (GIS)-enabled model for estimating and mitigating emissions of pollutants from urban regions into watersheds. The model uses land use categories and pollutant loadings to optimize strategic placement of filters to accommodate TMDLs. For example, in a city where the landuse pattern generates 4 × 10 6 kg of TSS, 55 kg of Cd, and 2 × 10 3 kg of Zn per year into 498 curb inlets that discharge into a sensitive watershed, the optimized placement of 137, 92, and 148 filters can achieve TMDL endpoints for each pollutant, respectively. We show further that 158 strategically placed filters effectively meet the requirements simultaneously for all three pollutants, a result at least 5 times more effective than random placement of filters. © 2006 American Chemical Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/esten_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Science and Technologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCaliforniaen_US
dc.subject.meshCitiesen_US
dc.subject.meshComputer Simulationen_US
dc.subject.meshDrainage, Sanitary - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshEfficiencyen_US
dc.subject.meshEnterobacteriaceae - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Monitoring - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshFiltration - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshGeographic Information Systemsen_US
dc.subject.meshGeologic Sediments - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshGuideline Adherenceen_US
dc.subject.meshMetals - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshRain - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshWaste Disposal, Fluid - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshWater Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshWater Pollutants - Analysis - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshWater Pollutants, Chemical - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshWater Purification - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshWater Supply - Analysisen_US
dc.titleOptimization of stormwater filtration at the urban/watershed interfaceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLejano, R: lejano@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLejano, R=rp01666en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/es060520fen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16913141-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33746591130en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33746591130&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume40en_HK
dc.identifier.issue15en_HK
dc.identifier.spage4794en_HK
dc.identifier.epage4801en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000239437600048-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHipp, JA=36718969500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOgunseitan, O=6603916894en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLejano, R=6602298801en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmith, CS=12041926900en_HK

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