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Article: Incompatible land uses and the topology of cumulative risk

TitleIncompatible land uses and the topology of cumulative risk
Authors
KeywordsAir toxics
Cumulative risk
Environmental justice
Risk assessment
Issue Date2006
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00267/
Citation
Environmental Management, 2006, v. 37 n. 2, p. 230-246 How to Cite?
AbstractThe extensive literature on environmental justice has, by now, well defined the essential ingredients of cumulative risk, namely, incompatible land uses and vulnerability. Most problematic is the case when risk is produced by a large aggregation of small sources of air toxics. In this article, we test these notions in an area of Southern California, Southeast Los Angeles (SELA), which has come to be known as Asthmatown. Developing a rapid risk mapping protocol, we scan the neighborhood for small potential sources of air toxics and find, literally, hundreds of small point sources within a 2-mile radius, interspersed with residences. We also map the estimated cancer risks and non-cancer hazard indices across the landscape. We find that, indeed, such large aggregations of even small, nondominant sources of air toxics can produce markedly elevated levels of risk. In this study, the risk profiles show additional cancer risks of up to 800 in a million and noncancer hazard indices of up to 200 in SELA due to the agglomeration of small point sources. This is significant (for example, estimates of the average regional point-source-related cancer risk range from 125 to 200 in a million). Most importantly, if we were to talk about the risk contour as if they were geological structures, we would observe not only a handful of distinct peaks, but a general "mountain range" running all throughout the study area, which underscores the ubiquity of risk in SELA. Just as cumulative risk has deeply embedded itself into the fabric of the place, so, too, must intervention seek to embed strategies into the institutions and practices of SELA. This has implications for advocacy, as seen in a recently initiated participatory action research project aimed at building health research capacities into the community in keeping with an ethic of care. © 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167136
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.857
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.830
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLejano, RPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSmith, CSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-28T04:04:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-28T04:04:34Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Management, 2006, v. 37 n. 2, p. 230-246en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0364-152Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167136-
dc.description.abstractThe extensive literature on environmental justice has, by now, well defined the essential ingredients of cumulative risk, namely, incompatible land uses and vulnerability. Most problematic is the case when risk is produced by a large aggregation of small sources of air toxics. In this article, we test these notions in an area of Southern California, Southeast Los Angeles (SELA), which has come to be known as Asthmatown. Developing a rapid risk mapping protocol, we scan the neighborhood for small potential sources of air toxics and find, literally, hundreds of small point sources within a 2-mile radius, interspersed with residences. We also map the estimated cancer risks and non-cancer hazard indices across the landscape. We find that, indeed, such large aggregations of even small, nondominant sources of air toxics can produce markedly elevated levels of risk. In this study, the risk profiles show additional cancer risks of up to 800 in a million and noncancer hazard indices of up to 200 in SELA due to the agglomeration of small point sources. This is significant (for example, estimates of the average regional point-source-related cancer risk range from 125 to 200 in a million). Most importantly, if we were to talk about the risk contour as if they were geological structures, we would observe not only a handful of distinct peaks, but a general "mountain range" running all throughout the study area, which underscores the ubiquity of risk in SELA. Just as cumulative risk has deeply embedded itself into the fabric of the place, so, too, must intervention seek to embed strategies into the institutions and practices of SELA. This has implications for advocacy, as seen in a recently initiated participatory action research project aimed at building health research capacities into the community in keeping with an ethic of care. © 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00267/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Managementen_HK
dc.subjectAir toxicsen_HK
dc.subjectCumulative risken_HK
dc.subjectEnvironmental justiceen_HK
dc.subjectRisk assessmenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAir Pollutants - Analysis - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshAir Pollution - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshBenzene - Analysis - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Monitoring - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshIndustrial Wasteen_US
dc.subject.meshLos Angelesen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Theoreticalen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessmenten_US
dc.subject.meshToluene - Analysis - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshUrban Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshVehicle Emissionsen_US
dc.titleIncompatible land uses and the topology of cumulative risken_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLejano, RP: lejano@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLejano, RP=rp01666en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00267-005-0031-7en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16362485-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-31544451880en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-31544451880&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume37en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage230en_HK
dc.identifier.epage246en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000234906500007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLejano, RP=6602298801en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmith, CS=12041926900en_HK

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