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Article: Mapping the industrial archeology of Boston

TitleMapping the industrial archeology of Boston
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherUrban and Regional Information Systems Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.urisa.org/urisajournal.
Citation
Urisa Journal, 2004, v. 16 n. 1, p. 5-13 How to Cite?
AbstractIn a pilot project initiated in September of 2001, the Boston Public Health Commission, in collaboration with the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, developed a methodology for super-imposing historical and present-day industrial land use data layers with demographic information and public health data. The goal was to identify and to possibly define a historical relationship between present-day public health concerns and past practices of land use within an urban environment. Historic data layers showing location and type of industries known to emit hazardous substances were interpreted from Sanborn Fire Insurance maps in the years 1888 and 1962. These historic industries, along with current-day industries listed under the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection Tier 21 and Major Facility databases, were classified according to the Standard Industrial Classification Manual published by the U.S. Department of Commerce, and linked to tables of hazardous chemicals associated with each type of industry. Using ESRI ArcView 3.2 GIS, the two historic data layers were then overlain with present-day census and public health data. A customized spatial filtering function was developed to highlight "hotspots" of significant industrial activity and the accumulated risk potential over a period of time. The result is an archeology of risk. The intent is to produce a planning tool for strategic environmental health intervention to serve professionals in government and the private sector, such as public health professionals, legislators, city planners, and environmental designers, as well as community-based organizations.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167132
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.215
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKolodziej, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorLejano, RPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSassa, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMaharjan, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGhaemghami, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPlant, Ten_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-28T04:04:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-28T04:04:33Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationUrisa Journal, 2004, v. 16 n. 1, p. 5-13en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1045-8077en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167132-
dc.description.abstractIn a pilot project initiated in September of 2001, the Boston Public Health Commission, in collaboration with the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, developed a methodology for super-imposing historical and present-day industrial land use data layers with demographic information and public health data. The goal was to identify and to possibly define a historical relationship between present-day public health concerns and past practices of land use within an urban environment. Historic data layers showing location and type of industries known to emit hazardous substances were interpreted from Sanborn Fire Insurance maps in the years 1888 and 1962. These historic industries, along with current-day industries listed under the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection Tier 21 and Major Facility databases, were classified according to the Standard Industrial Classification Manual published by the U.S. Department of Commerce, and linked to tables of hazardous chemicals associated with each type of industry. Using ESRI ArcView 3.2 GIS, the two historic data layers were then overlain with present-day census and public health data. A customized spatial filtering function was developed to highlight "hotspots" of significant industrial activity and the accumulated risk potential over a period of time. The result is an archeology of risk. The intent is to produce a planning tool for strategic environmental health intervention to serve professionals in government and the private sector, such as public health professionals, legislators, city planners, and environmental designers, as well as community-based organizations.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherUrban and Regional Information Systems Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.urisa.org/urisajournal.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofURISA Journalen_HK
dc.titleMapping the industrial archeology of Bostonen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLejano, RP: lejano@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLejano, RP=rp01666en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-16344382018en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-16344382018&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage5en_HK
dc.identifier.epage13en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKolodziej, K=36922847100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLejano, RP=6602298801en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSassa, C=8725995800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMaharjan, S=8725995900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGhaemghami, J=6506715244en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPlant, T=8725996100en_HK

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