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Article: Tragedy of the temporal commons: Soil-bound lead and the anachronicity of risk

TitleTragedy of the temporal commons: Soil-bound lead and the anachronicity of risk
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09640568.asp
Citation
Journal Of Environmental Planning And Management, 2005, v. 48 n. 2, p. 301-320 How to Cite?
AbstractIn 2002, a team of researchers from the University of California, Irvine collaborated with the community of Pacoima, California around a co-ordinated effort to analyze soil around the neighborhood for lead. The team found both total and bioavailable lead to be markedly higher in areas close to major highways, almost 20 years after leaded gasoline had been completely phased out. Multi-regression and cluster analyses reveal the association of elevated levels of total and bioavailable lead with proximity to major highways that cut through Pacoima. Moreover, bioavailability ratios are higher next to highways than elswere. What this reveals is an unexpected persistence of lead deposited bv vehicular emissions over a long period of time, a potentially intractable policy issue. The long residence time of soil lead represents an enduring public health problem, especially considering the numbers of those potentially exposed over time. It is unclear how expedient or realistic the conversion of land use around major highways might be, or how this new information might be integrated into ongoing movements for change. However, some policy actions can, even now, be considered-e.g. a closer policy focus on the bioavailable, not just total, fraction of soil lead. We also reflect upon how these traces in the soil give us a more profound sense of the cumulative burden that some communities have to bear due to a history of neglect. © 2005 University of Newcastle upon Tyne.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167131
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.71
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.710
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLejano, RPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorEricson, JEen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-28T04:04:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-28T04:04:33Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Environmental Planning And Management, 2005, v. 48 n. 2, p. 301-320en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0964-0568en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/167131-
dc.description.abstractIn 2002, a team of researchers from the University of California, Irvine collaborated with the community of Pacoima, California around a co-ordinated effort to analyze soil around the neighborhood for lead. The team found both total and bioavailable lead to be markedly higher in areas close to major highways, almost 20 years after leaded gasoline had been completely phased out. Multi-regression and cluster analyses reveal the association of elevated levels of total and bioavailable lead with proximity to major highways that cut through Pacoima. Moreover, bioavailability ratios are higher next to highways than elswere. What this reveals is an unexpected persistence of lead deposited bv vehicular emissions over a long period of time, a potentially intractable policy issue. The long residence time of soil lead represents an enduring public health problem, especially considering the numbers of those potentially exposed over time. It is unclear how expedient or realistic the conversion of land use around major highways might be, or how this new information might be integrated into ongoing movements for change. However, some policy actions can, even now, be considered-e.g. a closer policy focus on the bioavailable, not just total, fraction of soil lead. We also reflect upon how these traces in the soil give us a more profound sense of the cumulative burden that some communities have to bear due to a history of neglect. © 2005 University of Newcastle upon Tyne.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09640568.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Environmental Planning and Managementen_HK
dc.titleTragedy of the temporal commons: Soil-bound lead and the anachronicity of risken_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLejano, RP: lejano@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLejano, RP=rp01666en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0964056042000338190en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-16344378285en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-16344378285&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume48en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage301en_HK
dc.identifier.epage320en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLejano, RP=6602298801en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEricson, JE=7005736624en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike137803-

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